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Jon Dawson, Suvi Huikuri and Francisco Armada

Background:

The process of working together across sectors to improve health and to influence its determinants is often referred to as intersectoral action for health. The Liverpool Active City strategy and action plan were launched in 2005, bringing together partners from diverse sectors such as education, transport, and civil society to boost levels of physical activity among the city’s residents.

Methods:

The research material was based on semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and on review and analysis of gray literature and media reports. A case-study method was used to analyze the experience.

Results:

The results show that Liverpool Active City succeeded in boosting levels of physical activity among the city’s residents and demonstrate how intersectoral action benefited the goals of the program and promoted common aims.

Conclusions:

Important lessons can be drawn from the experience of Liverpool Active City for public health professionals and policy makers. Success factors include the involvement of a broad range of agencies from a variety of sectors, which reinforced the sense of partnership in the physical activity agenda and supported the implementation of activities. The experience also demonstrated how intersectoral action brought benefits to the physical activity goals of Liverpool Active City.

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Thiago Herick Sa, Emanuel Péricles Salvador and Alex Antonio Florindo

Background:

Physical inactivity in transportation is negatively related to many health outcomes. However, little is known about the correlates of this condition among people living in regions of low socioeconomic level.

Methods:

Cross-sectional study aimed to assess factors associated with physical inactivity in transportation among adults in the Eastern Zone of São Paulo, Brazil. Home-based interviews were conducted between May 2007 and January 2008 on a probabilistic sample of the adult population (≥18 years), totaling 368 men and 522 women. Factors associated with physical inactivity in transportation (less than 10 minutes per week of walking or cycling) were assessed using multivariate Poisson regression with hierarchical selection of variables.

Results:

Physical inactivity in transportation was associated with the presence of vehicles in the household in men (PR = 2.96) and women (PR = 2.42), with linear trend for both sexes (P < .001 and P = .004, respectively), even after adjusting for age, schooling level and chronic diseases (this last factor, only among women).

Conclusions:

Presence of vehicles in the household was associated positively with physical inactivity in transportation, both for men and for women. This should be taken into consideration in drawing up public policies for promoting physical activity.

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Luis F. Gomez, Olga L. Sarmiento, Diana C. Parra, Thomas L. Schmid, Michael Pratt, Enrique Jacoby, Andrea Neiman, Robert Cervero, Janeth Mosquera, Candance Rutt, Mauricio Ardila and José D. Pinzón

Background:

Even though there is increasing evidence that the built environment (BE) has an influence on leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), little is known about this relationship in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the associations between objective built environment characteristics and LTPA.

Methods:

A cross-sectional multilevel study was conducted in 27 neighborhoods in which 1315 adults aged 18−65 years were surveyed. An adapted version of the IPAQ (long version) was used to assess LTPA. Objective BE characteristics were obtained using Geographic Information Systems. Associations were assessed using multilevel polytomous logistic regression.

Results:

Compared with inactive people, those who resided in neighborhoods with the highest tertile dedicated to parks (7.4% to 25.2%) were more likely to be regularly active (POR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.13−3.72; P = 0.021). Those who resided in neighborhoods with presence of TransMilenio stations (mass public transportation system) were more likely to be irregularly active (POR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.07−1.50, P = 0.009) as compared with inactive people.

Conclusions:

These findings showed that park density and availability of TransMilenio stations at neighborhood level are positively associated with LTPA. Public health efforts to address physical inactivity should consider the potential influences of urban planning and mass public transportation systems on health.

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Bradley M. Appelhans and Hong Li

Purpose:

This study tested associations of organized sports participation and unstructured active play with overall moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in low-income children and examined factors associated with participation frequency.

Method:

Research staff visited 88 low-income Chicago households with children ages 6–13 years. MVPA was assessed through 7-day accelerometry. Researchers documented the home availability of physical activity equipment. Caregivers reported on child participation in organized sports and unstructured active play, family support for physical activity, perceived neighborhood safety, and access to neighborhood physical activity venues.

Results:

Despite similar participation in organized sports and unstructured active play, boys accumulated more MVPA than girls. MVPA was predicted by an interaction between gender and unstructured active play. Boys accumulated 23–45 additional minutes of weekday MVPA and 53–62 additional minutes of weekend MVPA through unstructured active play, with no such associations in girls. Higher reported neighborhood safety and family support for physical activity were associated with engagement in unstructured active play for both genders, and with participation in organized sports for girls.

Conclusion:

Physical activity interventions for low-income, urban children should emphasize unstructured active play, particularly in boys. Fostering family support for physical activity and safe play environments may be critical intervention components.

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Bruno de Souza Moreira, Amanda Cristina de Souza Andrade, Luciana de Souza Braga, Alessandra de Carvalho Bastone, Juliana Lustosa Torres, Maria Fernanda Furtado Lima-Costa and Waleska Teixeira Caiaffa

The study goal was to examine the association between perceived neighborhood characteristics and walking in urban older adults in Brazil. A cross-sectional study including 4,027 older adults from the baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSI-Brazil) was performed. Walking was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Neighborhood characteristics were questions about physical disorder, noise pollution, safety, violence, social cohesion, services, concerns with community mobility, and pleasantness. Multinomial logistic regression was used. Concern about taking the bus, subway, or train was inversely associated with walking for men. Violence (victim of theft, robbery, or had home broken into) and social cohesion (trust in neighbors) were positively and inversely associated with walking for women, respectively. A significant interaction term between social cohesion and number of chronic diseases was observed for women. These findings demonstrate the need for sex-specific interventions and policies to increase the walking levels among older Brazilian adults.

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

.2013.870518 24555781 10.1080/1536710X.2013.870518 8. Binswanger IA , Redmond N , Steiner JF , Hicks LS . Health disparities and the criminal justice system: an agenda for further research and action . J Urban Health . 2012 ; 89 ( 1 ): 98 – 107 . PubMed ID: 21915745 doi:10.1007/s11524

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Laura A. Dwyer, Minal Patel, Linda C. Nebeling and April Y. Oh

-country study . Health Psychol . 2014 ; 33 ( 7 ): 699 – 709 . PubMed doi:10.1037/a0033516 10.1037/a0033516 27. Van Dyck D , Cardon G , Deforche B , De Bourdeaudhuij I . Urban-rural differences in physical activity in Belgian adults and the importance of psychosocial factors . J Urban Health

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Alyson B. Harding, Nancy W. Glynn, Stephanie A. Studenski, Philippa J. Clarke, Ayushi A. Divecha and Andrea L. Rosso

interest to disclose. References Badland , H.M. ( 2010 ). Can virtual streetscape audits reliably replace physical streetscape audits? Journal of Urban Health, 87 ( 6 ), 1007 – 1016 . PubMed ID: 21104331 doi:10.1007/s11524-010-9505-x 10.1007/s11524-010-9505-x Charreire , H. , Mackenbach , J

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Kristen Day

. Cerin E , Sit CH , Barnett A , Cheung MC , Chan WM . Walking for recreation and perceptions of the neighborhood environment in older Chinese urban dwellers . J Urban Health . 2012 ; 90 ( 1 ): 55 – 66 . 55. Cerin E , Lee KY , Barnett A , Sit CH , Cheung MC , Chan WM

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Hayley Guiney, Michael Keall and Liana Machado

, J.M. , Kuo , J. , Rebok , G.W. , Xue , Q.L. , Fried , L.P. , Gruenewald , T.L. , … Carlson , M.C. ( 2015 ). Increases in lifestyle activities as a result of experience corps participation . Journal of Urban Health, 92 ( 1 ), 55 – 66 . PubMed doi:10.1007/s11524-014-9918-z 10.1007/s