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Jason D. Vescovi and Greig Watson

exercise, multiple training sessions sometimes occur on a single day (e.g., training camps), and matches are sometimes played on consecutive days (e.g., field hockey tournaments include ∼5 matches in 7–8 days). The prevalence of minimal hypohydration (first morning urine specific gravity [Usg] = 1.010 − 1

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Eric Kyle O’Neal, Samantha Louise Johnson, Brett Alan Davis, Veronika Pribyslavska and Mary Caitlin Stevenson-Wilcoxson

could be beneficial. Urine specific gravity (USG) meets both of these requirements and is cost and time effective. However, it is not considered to be an ideal assessment of hydration status unless used in conjunction with additional measurements (e.g., change from average body mass) and if the samples

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Robert A. Oppliger, Scott A. Magnes, LeRoy A. Popowski and Carl V. Gisolfi

To reduce the adverse consequences of exertion-related and acute intentional dehydration research has focused on monitoring hydration status. This investigation: 1) compared sensitivity of urine specific gravity (Usg), urine osmolality (Uosm) and a criterion measurement of hydration, plasma osmolality (Posm), at progressive stages of acute hypertonic dehydration and 2) using a medical decision model, determined whether Usg or Uosm accurately reflected hydra-tion status compared to Posm among 51 subjects tested throughout the day. Incremental changes in Posm were observed as subjects dehydrated by 5% of body weight and rehydrated while Usg and Uosm showed delayed dehydration-related changes. Using the medical decision model, sensitivity and specificity were not significant at selected cut-offs for Usg and Uosm. At the most accurate cut-off values, 1.015 and 1.020 for Usg and 700 mosm/kg and 800 mosm/kg for Uosm, only 65% of the athletes were correctly classified using Usg and 63% using Uosm. Posm, Usg, and Uosm appear sensitive to incremental changes in acute hypertonic dehydration, however, the misclassified outcomes for Usg and Uosm raise concerns. Research focused on elucidating the factors affecting accurate assessment of hydration status appears warranted.

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Mary Caitlin Stevenson Wilcoxson, Samantha Louise Johnson, Veronika Pribyslavska, James Mathew Green and Eric Kyle O’Neal

Runners are unlikely to consume fluid during training bouts increasing the importance of recovery rehydration efforts. This study assessed urine specific gravity (USG) responses following runs in the heat with different recovery fluid intake volumes. Thirteen male runners completed 3 evening running sessions resulting in approximately 2,200 ± 300 ml of sweat loss (3.1 ± 0.4% body mass) followed by a standardized dinner and breakfast. Beverage fluid intake (pre/postbreakfast) equaled 1,565/2,093 ml (low; L), 2,065/2,593 ml (moderate; M) and 2,565/3,356 mL (high; H). Voids were collected in separate containers. Increased urine output resulted in no differences (p > .05) in absolute mean fluid retention for waking or first postbreakfast voids. Night void averages excluding the first void postrun (1.025 ± 0.008; 1.013 ± 0.008; 1.006 ± 0.003), first morning (1.024 ± 0.004; 1.015 ± 0.005; 1.014 ± 0.005), and postbreakfast (1.022 ± 0.007; 1.014 ± 0.007; 1.008 ± 0.003) USG were higher (p < .05) for L versus M and H respectively and more clearly differentiated fluid intake volume between L and M than color or thirst sensation. Waking (r = -0.66) and postbreakfast (r = -0.71) USG were both significantly correlated (p < .001) with fluid replacement percentage, but not absolute fluid retention. Fluid intake M was reported as most similar to normal consumption (5.6 ± 1.0 on 0–10 scale) after breakfast and equaled 122 ± 16% of sweat losses. Retention data suggests consumption above this level is not warranted or actually practiced by most runners drinking ad libitum, but that periodic prerun USG assessment may be useful for coaches to detect runners that habitually consume low levels of fluids between training bouts in warm seasons.

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Pamela Jane Magee, Alison M. Gallagher and Jacqueline M. McCormack

Although dehydration of ≥ 2% body weight (BW) loss significantly impairs endurance performance, dehydration remains prevalent among athletes and may be owing to a lack of knowledge in relation to fluid requirements. The aim of this study was to assess the hydration status of university/club level athletes (n = 430) from a range of sports/activities (army officer cadet training; bootcamp training; cycling; Gaelic Athletic Association camogie, football and hurling; golf; hockey; netball; rugby; running (sprinting and endurance); Shotokan karate and soccer) immediately before and after training/competition and to assess their nutritional knowledge. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured immediately before and after exercise and BW loss during exercise was assessed. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using a validated questionnaire. 31.9% of athletes commenced exercise in a dehydrated state (USG >1.020) with 43.6% of participants dehydrated posttraining/competition. Dehydration was particularly prevalent (>40% of cohort) among karateka, female netball players, army officer cadets, and golfers. Golfers that commenced a competitive 18 hole round dehydrated took a significantly higher number of strokes to complete the round in comparison with their euhydrated counterparts (79.5 ± 2.1 vs. 75.7 ± 3.9 strokes, p = .049). Nutritional knowledge was poor among participants (median total score [IQR]; 52.9% [46.0, 59.8]), albeit athletes who were euhydrated at the start of exercise had a higher overall score in comparison with dehydrated athletes (55.2% vs. 50.6%, p = .001). Findings from the current study, therefore, have significant implications for the education of athletes in relation to their individual fluid requirements around exercise.

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Chin Han Lew, Gary Slater, Gobinathan Nair and Michelle Miller

This study investigated the relationship between changes in upon-waking body mass (BM) and changes in urine specific gravity (Usg) and urine color (Ucol) from 1 day to the next. Throughout the 5-day investigation, healthy adolescent Singaporean athletes (n = 66) had their upon-waking, bladder-voided BM measured. A small aliquot of the first bladder void each day was collected and analyzed for Usg and Ucol, the latter by both an investigator (IUcol) and individual participants (SUcol). Results revealed a significant inverse relationship between changes in BM and changes in Usg (p = .003) and Ucol (p = .001). On average, Usg and Ucol changed by ~0.003 units and ~1 color (across a 9-unit scale), respectively, with every 1% change in BM from 1 day to the next. There was a stronger relationship between Usg and IUcol (r = .82, p < .001) than between Usg and SUcol (r = .60, p < .001). These results suggest that the degree of fluid deficit may be predicted from the Usg measurements among moderately hypohydrated athletes. In addition, training athletes to interpret and use the Ucol chart is recommended.

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Nora R. Decher, Douglas J. Casa, Susan W. Yeargin, Matthew S. Ganio, Michelle L. Levreault, Catie L. Dann, Camille T. James, Megan A. McCaffrey, Caitlin B. O’Connor and Scott W. Brown

Purpose:

To assess the hydration status and level of hydration knowledge of youths at summer sports camps.

Methods:

Sixty-seven active youths, 57 males (mean ± SD, 12 ± 2 y, 136 ± 16 cm, 50.6 ± 21.1 kg) and 10 females (13 ± 2 y, 153 ± 8 cm, 45.2 ± 9.0 kg) participated in 4 d of sports camp. Hydration status was assessed before the first practice (AM) and after the second practice (PM). Participants completed suriveys assessing hydration knowledge (HAQ) and hydration habits on day 3 and a self-assessment (EQ#1).

Results:

Mean AM urine specific gravity (USG) and urine osmolality (Uosm) scores ranged from minimal to significant dehydration across 4 d, even when temperatures were mild. Correlations between hydration indices and EQ#1, ranging from 0.11 to −0.51, were statistically significant (P < .05), indicating that subjects recognized when they were doing a good or bad job hydrating. HAQ did not correlate strongly with hydration indices suggesting other impediments to hydration. Thirst correlated negatively with EQ#1 (from −0.29 to −0.60).

Conclusion:

Hydration at summer sports camp is a concern and special efforts need to be made to help youths develop hydration strategies.

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Dean G. Higham, Geraldine A. Naughton, Lauren A. Burt and Xiaocai Shi

The aim of this study was to compare daily hydration profiles of competitive adolescent swimmers and less active maturation- and sex-matched controls. Hydration profiles of 35 competitive adolescent swimmers (male n = 18, female n = 17) and 41 controls (male n = 29, female n = 12) were monitored on 4 consecutive days. First morning hydration status was determined independently by urine specific gravity (USG) and urine color. Changes in fluid balance were estimated during the school day and in training sessions after adjusting for self-reported urine losses and fluid intake. Urinalyses revealed consistent fluid deficits (USG >1.020, urine color ≥5) independent of activity group, sex, and day of testing (hypohydration in 73–85% of samples, p > .05). Fluid balance and intake were observed over typical school days in males and females from the 2 groups. During training, male swimmers lost more fluid relative to initial body mass but drank no more than females. Although both activity groups began each testing day with a similar hydration status, training induced significant variations in fluid balance in the swimmers compared with controls. Despite minimal fluid losses during individual training sessions (<2% body mass), these deficits significantly increased fluid needs for young swimmers over the school day.

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Lawrence E. Armstrong, Amy C. Pumerantz, Melissa W. Roti, Daniel A. Judelson, Greig Watson, Joao C. Dias, Bülent Sökmen, Douglas J. Casa, Carl M. Maresh, Harris Lieberman and Mark Kellogg

This investigation determined if 3 levels of controlled caffeine consumption affected fluid-electrolyte balance and renal function differently. Healthy males (mean ± standard deviation; age, 21.6 ± 3.3 y) consumed 3 mg caffeine · kg−1 · d−1 on days 1 to 6 (equilibration phase). On days 7 to 11 (treatment phase), subjects consumed either 0 mg (C0; placebo; n = 20), 3 mg (C3; n = 20), or 6 mg (C6; n = 19) caffeine · kg−1 · d−1 in capsules, with no other dietary caffeine intake. The following variables were unaffected (P > 0.05) by different caffeine doses on days 1, 3, 6, 9, and 11 and were within normal clinical ranges: body mass, urineosmolality, urine specific gravity, urine color, 24-h urine volume, 24-h Na+ and K+ excretion, 24-h creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum Na+ and K+, serum osmolality, hematocrit, and total plasma protein. Therefore, C0, C3, and C6 exhibited no evidence of hypohydration. These findings question the widely accepted notion that caffeine consumption acts chronically as a diuretic.

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Emily C. Borden, William J. Kraemer, Bryant J. Walrod, Emily M. Post, Lydia K. Caldwell, Matthew K. Beeler, William H. DuPont, John Paul Anders, Emily R. Martini, Jeff S. Volek and Carl M. Maresh

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in the state of hydration in elite National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I collegiate wrestlers during and after a season.

Methods:

Ohio State University wrestling team members (N= 6; mean ± SD; age, 19.6±1.1 yrs.; height, 171.6±2.9 cm; body mass 69.5±8.1 kg) gave informed consent to participate in the investigation with measurements (i.e., body mass, urine specific gravity [2 methods] (USG), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) thirst scale, plasma osmolality) obtained during and after the season.

Results:

Measurements for USG, regardless of methods were not significantly different between visits but plasma osmolality was significantly (P =0.001) higher at the beginning of the season 295.5±4.9 mOsm ∙ kg-1 compared to 279.6±6.1 mOsm ∙ kg-1 after the season. No changes in thirst ratings were observed and the two measures of USG were highly correlated (r > 0.9, P=0.000) at each time point, but USG and plasma osmolality were not.

Conclusion:

A paradox in the clinical interpretation of euhydration in the beginning of the season was observed with the USG indicating the wrestlers were properly hydrated while the plasma osmolality showed they were not. Thus, the tracking of hydration status during the season is a concern when using only NCAA policies and procedures. The wrestlers did return to normal euhydration levels after the season on both biomarkers which is remarkable, as prior studies have indicated this may not happen due to a re-regulation of the osmol-regulatory center of the brain.