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Jonathon Weakley, Carlos Ramirez-Lopez, Shaun McLaren, Nick Dalton-Barron, Dan Weaving, Ben Jones, Kevin Till and Harry Banyard

Velocity-based training (VBT) is a contemporary method of resistance training that accounts for fluctuations in physical characteristics and daily readiness. 1 , 2 In addition, implementing VBT can enable practitioners to accurately prescribe velocity loss thresholds (eg, a 10% velocity loss

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Miguel Sánchez-Moreno, David Rodríguez-Rosell, Fernando Pareja-Blanco, Ricardo Mora-Custodio and Juan José González-Badillo

seems more appropriate to terminate each training set as soon as a certain level of neuromuscular fatigue is detected. 9 , 10 In this regard, recent studies have shown that (1) the velocity loss in the set shows very strong relationships with mechanical and metabolic measures of fatigue, 10 – 12 and

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Fernando Pareja-Blanco, Luis Sánchez-Medina, Luis Suárez-Arrones and Juan José González-Badillo

Purpose:

To analyze the effects of 2 resistance-training (RT) programs that used the same relative loading but different repetition volume, using the velocity loss during the set as the independent variable: 15% (VL15) vs 30% (VL30).

Methods:

Sixteen professional soccer players with RT experience (age 23.8 ± 3.5 y, body mass 75.5 ± 8.6 kg) were randomly assigned to 2 groups, VL15 (n = 8) or VL30 (n = 8), that followed a 6-wk (18-session) velocity-based squat-training program. Repetition velocity was monitored in all sessions. Assessments performed before (Pre) and after training (Post) included estimated 1-repetition maximum (1RM) and change in average mean propulsive velocity (AMPV) against absolute loads common to Pre and Post tests, countermovement jump (CMJ), 30-m sprint (T30), and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (YIRT). Null-hypothesis significance testing and magnitude-based-inference statistical analyses were performed.

Results:

VL15 obtained greater gains in CMJ height than VL30 (P < .05), with no significant differences between groups for the remaining variables. VL15 showed a likely/possibly positive effect on 1RM (91/9/0%), AMPV (73/25/2%), and CMJ (87/12/1%), whereas VL30 showed possibly/unclear positive effects on 1RM (65/33/2%) and AMPV (46/36/18%) and possibly negative effects on CMJ (4/38/57%). The effects on T30 performance were unclear/unlikely for both groups, whereas both groups showed most likely/likely positive effects on YIRT.

Conclusions:

A velocity-based RT program characterized by a low degree of fatigue (15% velocity loss in each set) is effective to induce improvements in neuromuscular performance in professional soccer players with previous RT experience.

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Harry G. Banyard, James J. Tufano, Jose Delgado, Steve W. Thompson and Kazunori Nosaka

VBT approach is characterized by the cessation of a working set if mean velocity (MV) of a repetition falls below a predetermined velocity loss threshold. 12 For example, Padulo et al 2 implemented a 20% velocity loss threshold and showed that maintaining at least 80% of MV during training results

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Brad Hedrick, Yong Tai Wang, Manssour Moeinzadeh and Marlene Adrian

The relationship between variations in wheelchair racers’ frontal area in erect, flexed, and rotated upper trunk positions and coasting efficiency was investigated in two experiments. The first involved three male racers with national and international racing experience, and the second involved four men and three women with national or international racing experience. In both experiments, frontal area changed significantly across the three positions. Concurrently, reductions in frontal area coincided predictably with reductions in the percent of initial velocity loss experienced during the coast-down tests across the postural conditions within both experiments. Through ANOVA with repeated measures, the flexed position demonstrated significantly better coasting efficiency than the erect condition in Experiment 1. In Experiment 2, the rotated condition demonstrated significantly better coasting efficiency than the erect condition. Generally, the results support the contention that wheelchair coasting efficiency can be improved by adopting upper torso positions that reduce the racer’s frontal area.

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James J. Tufano, Jenny A. Conlon, Sophia Nimphius, Lee E. Brown, Harry G. Banyard, Bryce D. Williamson, Leslie G. Bishop, Amanda J. Hopper and G. Gregory Haff

Purpose:

To determine the effects of intraset rest frequency and training load on muscle time under tension, external work, and external mechanical power output during back-squat protocols with similar changes in velocity.

Methods:

Twelve strength-trained men (26.0 ± 4.2 y, 83.1 ± 8.8 kg, 1.75 ± 0.06 m, 1.88:0.19 one-repetition-maximum [1RM] body mass) performed 3 sets of 12 back squats using 3 different set structures: traditional sets with 60% 1RM (TS), cluster sets of 4 with 75% 1RM (CS4), and cluster sets of 2 with 80% 1RM (CS2). Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences in peak force (PF), mean force (MF), peak velocity (PV), mean velocity (MV), peak power (PP), mean power (MP), total work (TW), total time under tension (TUT), percentage mean velocity loss (%MVL), and percentage peak velocity loss (%PVL) between protocols.

Results:

Compared with TS and CS4, CS2 resulted in greater MF, TW, and TUT in addition to less MV, PV, and MP. Similarly, CS4 resulted in greater MF, TW, and TUT in addition to less MV, PV, and MP than TS did. There were no differences between protocols for %MVL, %PVL, PF, or PP.

Conclusions:

These data show that the intraset rest provided in CS4 and CS2 allowed for greater external loads than with TS, increasing TW and TUT while resulting in similar PP and %VL. Therefore, cluster-set structures may function as an alternative method to traditional strength- or hypertrophy-oriented training by increasing training load without increasing %VL or decreasing PP.

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Jesualdo Cuevas-Aburto, Ivan Jukic, Jorge Miguel González-Hernández, Danica Janicijevic, Paola Barboza-González, Luis Javier Chirosa-Ríos and Amador García-Ramos

velocity loss within each set (20%) was associated with similar squat maximal strength gains but greater enhancements in vertical jump height than training with a higher velocity loss (40%), despite the fact that the latter group performed 40% more repetitions during an 8‐week training intervention. These

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Justin J. Merrigan, James J. Tufano, Jonathan M. Oliver, Jason B. White, Jennifer B. Fields and Margaret T. Jones

traditional sets (TS), the velocity generally decreases, 2 and the magnitude of velocity loss is directly related to the number of sets and repetitions performed. For example, 3 sets of 8 repetitions leads to a 32% reduction in velocity, whereas 3 sets of 12 repetitions leads to a 46% reduction in concentric

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Muscle-Strength Asymmetry via a Unilateral-Stance Isometric Midthigh Pull Thomas Dos’Santos * Christopher Thomas * Paul A. Jones * Paul Comfort * 4 2017 12 4 505 511 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0179 Effects of Velocity Loss During Resistance Training on Performance in Professional Soccer Players Fernando

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* Lynsey Johnston * Ole J. Kemi * 1 02 2020 15 2 168 179 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0901 ijspp.2018-0901 The Effects of 10%, 20%, and 30% Velocity Loss Thresholds on Kinetic, Kinematic, and Repetition Characteristics During the Barbell Back Squat Jonathon Weakley * Carlos Ramirez-Lopez * Shaun McLaren