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Borja Muniz-Pardos, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alex González-Agüero, Alba Gómez-Cabello, José A. Casajús and Germán Vicente-Rodríguez

stimulus (as measured through electromyography) to generate acute increases in muscle strength is individualized. These authors concluded that the individualized vibratory stimulus of each athlete should be determined in advance to maximize the benefits from this training method. A final point to consider

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Jennifer L. Lister, Gianluca Del Rossi, Fangchao Ma, Mark Stoutenberg, Jessica B. Adams, Sara Tobkin and Joseph F. Signorile

Context:

There are numerous ways to overload the scapular stabilizers.

Objectives:

To assess scapular stabilizer activity using the Bodyblade® and other traditional training devices.

Design:

Repeated measures analysis of surface EMG data collected from the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior (SA) during shoulder flexion and abduction using Bodyblade®, cuff weight, and Thera-Band® resistance.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Participants:

Thirty collegiate athletes (20.0 ± 1.7 years).

Intervention:

Participants performed 10 repetitions of shoulder flexion and abduction.

Main Outcome Measures:

For each movement, normalized root mean square values (NrmsEMG) were computed for each muscle during each repetition under each training condition. Data were analyzed using 3 (condition) × 10 (repetition) repeated measures ANOVAs.

Results:

During shoulder flexion and abduction, the NrmsEMG of the UT, LT, and SA were significantly greater when using the Bodyblade® than the Thera-Band® or cuff weight.

Conclusion:

The Bodyblade® produces greater scapular activity than traditional resistance techniques.

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Joseph S. Soltys and Sara E. Wilson

Regulating spinal motion requires proprioceptive feedback. While studies have investigated the sensing of static lumbar postures, few have investigated sensing lumbar movement speed. In this study, proprioceptive contributions to lateral trunk motion were examined during paraspinal muscle vibration. Seventeen healthy subjects performed lateral trunk flexion movements while lying prone with pelvis fixed. A 44.5-Hz vibratory stimulus was applied to the paraspinal muscles at the L3 level. Subjects attempted to match target paces of 9.5, 13.5, and 17.5 deg/s with and without paraspinal muscle vibration. Vibration of the paraspinal musculature was found to result in slower overall lateral flexion. This effect was found to have a greater influence in the difference of directional velocities with vibration applied to the left musculature. These changes reflect the sensitivity of lumbar velocity sense to applied vibration leading to the perception of faster muscle lengthening and ultimately resulting in slower movement velocities. This suggests that muscle spindle organs modulate the ability to sense velocity of motion and are important in the control of dynamic motion of the spine.

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Karinna Sonálya Aires da Costa, Daniel Tezoni Borges, Liane de Brito Macedo, Caio Alano de Almeida Lins and Jamilson Simões Brasileiro

suggests that these effects arise from the probable mechanism triggered by the stretch reflex. 10 – 12 Exposure to vibratory stimulus promotes an increase in excitatory feedback from muscle spindles. 10 – 12 Batista et al 5 reports significant improvement for maximum strength performance of the lower