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Yongwoo Lee, Wonjae Choi, Kyeongjin Lee, Changho Song, and Seungwon Lee

; Iwamoto et al., 2009 ). However, a simple exercise may become monotonous or boring to older adults. Alternatively, augmented reality, virtual reality, and video-game-based training are available ( de Bruin, Schoene, Pichierri, & Smith, 2010 ; Duque et al., 2013 ). In particular, previous studies have

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Gustavo Sandri Heidner, Patrick M. Rider, J.C. Mizelle, Caitlin M. O’Connell, Nicholas P. Murray, and Zachary J. Domire

The use of virtual reality (VR) in the clinical setting has increased substantially in recent years. 1 It has been established as an efficacious tool for balance and gait rehabilitation in neurological patients and provides improved benefits when combined with conventional rehabilitation. 2 A

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Brad Thatcher, Georgi Ivanov, Mihaly Szerovay, and Graham Mills

Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging learning technology and the heir to more conventional video learning methods used in contemporary society ( Akbaş et al., 2019 ; Vignais, Kulpa, Brault, Presse, & Bideau, 2015 ). VR creates an artificial, immersive, and responsive environment, providing a user

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Mariam A. Ameer and Qassim I. Muaidi

specialists who use stretch-induced change to RT to protect patients from losing dynamic balance and decrease the risk of falling. The techniques employed in most of the previous studies lack in emulating real situation while performing measurements. To address this, virtual reality (VR) systems have been

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Guan-Bo Chen, Che-Wei Lin, Hung-Ya Huang, Yi-Jhen Wu, Hung-Tzu Su, Shu-Fen Sun, and Sheng-Hui Tuan

-practiced, overwhelming, and task-oriented exercises ( Winstein et al., 2016 ). Achieving these principles would demand devoting time, workforce, and money to rehabilitation. Interactive video gaming and virtual reality (VR) provide new platforms for the delivery of exercise programs, particularly in settings facing

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Gopal Nambi, Walid Kamal Abdelbasset, Saud F. Alsubaie, Ayman K. Saleh, Anju Verma, Mohamed A. Abdelaziz, and Abdulaziz A. Alkathiry

objectives like improving sensory reorganization and stimulatory effects on stress hormones. Virtual reality training (VRT) is an advanced rehabilitation procedure which fulfills both objectives through a virtual environment by a computer. It stimulates the cognition property through sensory feedback

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Chih-Hung Chen, Ming-Chang Jeng, Chin-Ping Fung, Ji-Liang Doong, and Tien-Yow Chuang

Context:

Whether virtual rehabilitation is beneficial has not been determined.

Objective:

To investigate the psychological benefits of virtual reality in rehabilitation.

Design:

An experimental group underwent therapy with a virtual-reality-based exercise bike, and a control group underwent the therapy without virtual-reality equipment.

Setting:

Hospital laboratory.

Patients:

30 patients suffering from spinal-cord injury.

Intervention:

A designed rehabilitation therapy.

Main Outcome Measures:

Endurance, Borg's rating-of-perceived-exertion scale, the Activation–Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD-ACL), and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire.

Results:

The differences between the experimental and control groups were significant for AD-ACL calmness and tension.

Conclusion:

A virtual-reality-based rehabilitation program can ease patients' tension and induce calm.

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Sahba Taslimipour, Zahra Rojhani-Shirazi, Ladan Hemmati, and Iman Rezaei

. Regular exercises that strengthen the back extensor muscles along with corrective exercises 13 , 14 can improve THK by slowing the process of deformation, thereby maintaining healthy posture. An increasingly common method of exercise therapy for postural problems is virtual reality (VR)-based exercises

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Kathryn Mills, Aula Idris, Thu-An Pham, John Porte, Mark Wiggins, and Manolya Kavakli

is that these studies used internally focused feedback, that is, participants focused on their knee position. Benjaminse et al 13 argue that this method of feedback may interfere with the natural coordination of the movement and automaticity of the skill. Virtual reality (VR) may be provide a

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Stewart T. Cotterill

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in virtual-reality (VR) applications across a broad range of performance domains. This interest has, in part, been driven by significant advancements in the technology available in terms of hardware, software, and, crucially, computer processing