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Yongwoo Lee, Wonjae Choi, Kyeongjin Lee, Changho Song and Seungwon Lee

; Iwamoto et al., 2009 ). However, a simple exercise may become monotonous or boring to older adults. Alternatively, augmented reality, virtual reality, and video-game-based training are available ( de Bruin, Schoene, Pichierri, & Smith, 2010 ; Duque et al., 2013 ). In particular, previous studies have

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Mariam A. Ameer and Qassim I. Muaidi

specialists who use stretch-induced change to RT to protect patients from losing dynamic balance and decrease the risk of falling. The techniques employed in most of the previous studies lack in emulating real situation while performing measurements. To address this, virtual reality (VR) systems have been

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Chih-Hung Chen, Ming-Chang Jeng, Chin-Ping Fung, Ji-Liang Doong and Tien-Yow Chuang

Context:

Whether virtual rehabilitation is beneficial has not been determined.

Objective:

To investigate the psychological benefits of virtual reality in rehabilitation.

Design:

An experimental group underwent therapy with a virtual-reality-based exercise bike, and a control group underwent the therapy without virtual-reality equipment.

Setting:

Hospital laboratory.

Patients:

30 patients suffering from spinal-cord injury.

Intervention:

A designed rehabilitation therapy.

Main Outcome Measures:

Endurance, Borg's rating-of-perceived-exertion scale, the Activation–Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD-ACL), and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire.

Results:

The differences between the experimental and control groups were significant for AD-ACL calmness and tension.

Conclusion:

A virtual-reality-based rehabilitation program can ease patients' tension and induce calm.

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Kathryn Mills, Aula Idris, Thu-An Pham, John Porte, Mark Wiggins and Manolya Kavakli

is that these studies used internally focused feedback, that is, participants focused on their knee position. Benjaminse et al 13 argue that this method of feedback may interfere with the natural coordination of the movement and automaticity of the skill. Virtual reality (VR) may be provide a

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Stewart T. Cotterill

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in virtual-reality (VR) applications across a broad range of performance domains. This interest has, in part, been driven by significant advancements in the technology available in terms of hardware, software, and, crucially, computer processing

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Jason P. Mihalik, Luv Kohli and Mary C. Whitton

Context:

Virtual reality environments may allow researchers to investigate functional balance performance without risks associated with testing in the real world.

Objective:

To investigate the effects of the mass of a head-mounted display (HMD) on balance performance.

Design:

Counterbalanced pretest-posttest.

Setting:

Virtual reality laboratory.

Participants:

20 healthy college students.

Intervention(s):

Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) with a tracker-only headband and again with tracker plus HMD was performed.

Main Outcome Measures:

BESS error scores, elliptical sway area, and center of pressure travel distance were recorded.

Results:

No effect of the HMD mass on balance performance was observed. A significant stance by surface interaction was present but was negated when the HMD conditions were included in the model.

Conclusions:

The mass of a HMD has not been proven to adversely affect balance performance. These data suggest the HMD mass is not a contraindication to the use of immersive virtual environments in future concussion research involving balance.

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Yi-An Chen, Yu-Chen Chung, Rachel Proffitt, Eric Wade and Carolee Winstein

Attention during exercise is known to affect performance; however, the attentional demand inherent to virtual reality (VR)-based exercise is not well understood. We used a dual-task paradigm to compare the attentional demands of VR-based and non-VR-based (conventional, real-world) exercise: 22 older adults (with no diagnosed disabilities) performed a primary reaching task to virtual and real targets in a counterbalanced block order while verbally responding to an unanticipated auditory tone in one third of the trials. The attentional demand of the primary reaching task was inferred from the voice response time (VRT) to the auditory tone. Participants’ engagement level and task experience were also obtained using questionnaires. The virtual target condition was more attention demanding (significantly longer VRT) than the real target condition. Secondary analyses revealed a significant interaction between engagement level and target condition on attentional demand. For participants who were highly engaged, attentional demand was high and independent of target condition. However, for those who were less engaged, attentional demand was low and depended on target condition (i.e., virtual > real). These findings add important knowledge to the growing body of research pertaining to the development and application of technology-enhanced exercise for older adults and for rehabilitation purposes.

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Anat V. Lubetzky, Daphna Harel, Helene Darmanin and Ken Perlin

normal and abnormal responses to changing visual cues with eyes open in situations relevant to daily living ( Jeka et al., 2006 ). In the past few years, there have been substantial advancements in virtual reality (VR) technology. The ability to carefully manipulate visual environments has become simpler

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Michael Gay and Semyon Slobounov

dysfunction (structural data) in the brain after trauma. Advances in modalities such as functional neuroimaging, quantitative electroencephalography, and virtual reality–based cognitive testing combined with current clinical batteries of exams such as neuropsychological testing, oculomotor examination, and

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Christopher A. DiCesare, Adam W. Kiefer, Scott Bonnette and Gregory D. Myer

may overcome the limitations of classical assessments involves simulating sport-specific environments through virtual reality (VR), which can effectively present simulated scenarios that facilitate real-world athletic performance and competition. 16 , 17 VR-based assessments may provide a more