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Erich J. Petushek, Edward T. Cokely, Paul Ward and Gregory D. Myer

Instrument-based biomechanical movement analysis is an effective injury screening method but relies on expensive equipment and time-consuming analysis. Screening methods that rely on visual inspection and perceptual skill for prognosticating injury risk provide an alternative approach that can significantly reduce cost and time. However, substantial individual differences exist in skill when estimating injury risk performance via observation. The underlying perceptual-cognitive mechanisms of injury risk identification were explored to better understand the nature of this skill and provide a foundation for improving performance. Quantitative structural and process modeling of risk estimation indicated that superior performance was largely mediated by specific strategies and skills (e.g., irrelevant information reduction), and independent of domain-general cognitive abilities (e.g., mental rotation, general decision skill). These cognitive models suggest that injury prediction expertise (i.e., ACL-IQ) is a trainable skill, and provide a foundation for future research and applications in training, decision support, and ultimately clinical screening investigations.

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Matthew S. Tenan, Andrew J. Tweedell and Courtney A. Haynes

mean of the 6 visual assessments (2 from each investigator) was used as the ‘gold standard’ for contrasting with the algorithmic approaches. 2 , 14 Algorithmic Detection of Muscle Onset Prior to algorithmic analysis, the raw waveform was zero-lag bandpass filtered (10 Hz–1 kHz) to remove

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for analyzing the kinematics of an individual’s movement? a. 2D video analysis using fixed tripod b. 2D video analysis using handheld device c. 3D video analysis d. live visual assessment using rating scale 7. In this study, each participant performed six successful trials of a two-footed drop

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Lachlan E. Garrick, Bryce C. Alexander, Anthony G. Schache, Marcus G. Pandy, Kay M. Crossley and Natalie J. Collins

-leg squat test, whereas between-group differences in the hip adduction angle occurred around the time of peak knee flexion (Figure  2 ). Table 2 Between-Group Differences in Peak Biomechanical Variables, Relating to Visual Rating Criteria Good (n = 14) Poor (n = 11) Visual assessment criterion Corresponding

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Emily E. Gerstle, Kristian O’Connor, Kevin G. Keenan and Stephen C. Cobb

strategy was determined via visual assessment, with a rearfoot landing strategy defined as contact with the heel followed by plantar flexion of the foot during weight acceptance. Landings with a neutral foot position or forefoot contact followed by dorsiflexion during weight acceptance were considered a

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Bryan R. Picco, Meghan E. Vidt and Clark R. Dickerson

examination tests have no demonstrable clinical utility in diagnosis of shoulder pathology. However, others have recommended use of visual assessment techniques. 50 While a quantitative clinical consensus standard has not been established 17 it is possible that future determinations of clinically important

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Joshua Woods

demographic data: state of residence, sex, racial/ethnic characteristics, education, date of birth, and size of Facebook group. Caution should be used when drawing assumptions about a person’s race and sex based on photographs. Although coding these variables based on visual assessment is a common practice of

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Jordan A. Carlson, J. Aaron Hipp, Jacqueline Kerr, Todd S. Horowitz and David Berrigan

/Neighborhood Disorder Curated Manual/Computer Assisted Neighborhood Visual Assessment System (CANVAS) ( Mooney et al., 2017 ) Photovoice Safety, Engagement, Perception Community Environment Assets Participant Group Discussion of Photos/Researcher Summary/Mapping of Sources ( Wang & Pies, 2004 ) Photovoice (“Our Voice

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Maggi M. Calo, Thomas Anania, Joseph D. Bello, Valerie A. Cohen, Siobhan C. Stack, Meredith D. Wells, Barbara C. Belyea, Deborah L. King and Jennifer M. Medina McKeon

were used to identify bony landmarks because it does increase the time to test each participant. In the interest of using methods that would be most feasible for clinicians, we opted to use a visual assessment of bony landmarks. Any inconsistency in landmark identification would be exposed in the

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Ben Langley, Mary Cramp and Stewart C. Morrison

in a more dorsiflexed position compared with the motion control and cushioned shoes. In the transverse plane, ankle abduction upon IC and peak abduction were significantly greater when running in the motion control shoe compared with the neutral shoe (Table  2 ). Visual assessment of Figure  2