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Madeleine E. Hackney, Courtney D. Hall, Katharina V. Echt and Steven L. Wolf

Evidence-based recommendations for interventions to reduce fall risk in older adults with visual impairment are lacking. Adapted tango dance (Tango) and a balance and mobility program (FallProof) have improved mobility, balance, and quality of life (QOL) in individuals with movement impairment. This study compared the efficacy of Tango and FallProof for 32 individuals with visual impairment (age: M = 79.3, SD =11 [51–95 years]). Participants were assigned to Tango or FallProof to complete twenty, 90-min lessons within 12 weeks. Participants underwent assessment of balance, dual-tasking, endurance, gait, and vision-related QOL. The balance reactions of participants in both groups improved (p < .001). Endurance, cognitive dual-tasking, and vision-related QOL may have improved more for Tango than FallProof. Group differences and gains were maintained across time. Both programs could be effective options for motor rehabilitation for older adults with visual impairment because they may improve mobility and QOL while reducing fall risk.

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Meridith Griffin, Brett Smith, P. David Howe and Cassandra Phoenix

In this paper we present a scoping review of literature on aging, visual impairment, and physical activity. Our objectives are to: (a) explore the available literature on aging, physical activity, and sight loss; (b) describe how participation in physical activity by older adults with visual impairment is understood by researchers; and, (c) identify benefits, barriers, and facilitators of physical activity participation as reported by older adults with age-related sight loss. Over 2,000 sources were reviewed, with 30 studies meeting eligibility criteria. Findings were organized into four thematic categories, namely: (a) participation rates; (b) health inequalities; (c) barriers to physical activity participation; and, (d) benefits of physical activity participation. Through this scoping review process, extant knowledge was synthesized and gaps in the literature were critically assessed. To address these gaps, several avenues for future research are outlined and described, alongside a consideration of the implications of the scoping review findings for both policy and practice.

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Ali Brian, Sally Taunton, Lauren J. Lieberman, Pamela Haibach-Beach, John Foley and Sara Santarossa

, DeMartelaer, Samaey, & Andries, 2008 ), which was the original intent of its developers ( Ulrich, 1985 , 2000 ). Given the frequency and severity of gross motor delays for individuals with visual impairments ( Haegele, Brian, & Goodway, 2015 ; Haibach, Wagner, & Lieberman, 2014 ; Houwen, Hartman

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Justin A. Haegele and T. Nicole Kirk

physical education, such as poorly trained teachers and paraeducators, a lack of support, and a lack of adapted equipment ( Perkins, Columna, Lieberman, & Bailey, 2013 ). Because of these factors, differences between youth with visual impairments and others tend to be emphasized during physical education

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Xihe Zhu and Justin A. Haegele

used in adapted physical activity research examining physical activity among individuals with disabilities ( Cervantes & Porretta, 2010 ; Leung, Siebert, & Yun, 2017 ), including those with visual impairments ( Ayvazoglu, Oh, & Kozub, 2006 ; Brian et al., 2019 ; Cervantes & Porretta, 2013 ; Haegele

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Justin A. Haegele, Takahiro Sato, Xihe Zhu and T. Nicole Kirk

In recent years, several studies have explored the experiential perspectives of youth with visual impairments (i.e., those with low vision and complete blindness) toward their physical education experiences ( de Schipper, Lieberman, & Moody, 2017 ; Haegele, Sato, Zhu, & Avery, 2017 ; Haegele

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Luis Columna, Denzil A. Streete, Samuel R. Hodge, Suzanna Rocco Dillon, Beth Myers, Michael L. Norris, Tiago V. Barreira and Kevin S. Heffernan

Prevention, 2016 ). Unfortunately, children with visual impairments (VI), that is, those who are blind or who have low vision, are not meeting national guidelines for PA and tend to be more sedentary than their peers without disabilities ( Kozub & Oh, 2004 ). Due to limited PA opportunities and inactivity

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Soubhagyalaxmi Mohanty, Balaram Pradhan and Alex Hankey

, 2011 ; D’souza & Avadhany, 2014 ; Purohit, Pradhan, & Nagendra, 2016 ; Telles, Singh, Bhardwaj, Kumar, & Balkrishna, 2013 ). The previous evidence suggests that yoga-based health promotion programs showed positive improvement in children without visual impairment (VI) and may also bring improvements

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Ali Brian, An De Meester, Aija Klavina, J. Megan Irwin, Sally Taunton, Adam Pennell and Lauren J. Lieberman

literacy, there has been little attention to the physical literacy journeys of populations of individuals with visual impairments (VIs). Within the components of Dudley’s ( 2015 ) observational model of physical literacy, some evidence exists regarding the competence and confidence of children with VI

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Kate A.T. Eddy and Stephen D. Mellalieu

The purpose of this study was to investigate imagery experiences in performers with visual impairments. Structured, in-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with six elite goalball athletes regarding the processing and use of mental images in training and competition. Interview transcripts were analyzed using deductive and inductive procedures and revealed four general dimensions describing the athletes’ uses of imagery. Participants reported using imagery for cognitive and motivational purposes in both training and competition. Imagery was also suggested to be utilized from an internal perspective with the processing of images derived from a range of modalities. The findings suggest that visual impairment does not restrict the ability to use mental imagery and that psychological interventions can be expanded to include the use of all the athletes’ sensory modalities.