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Haiko B. Zimmermann, Débora Knihs, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Brian MacIntosh, and Juliano Dal Pupo

improvement in voluntary performance, known as postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE). 3 – 5 Physical performance may be affected after a CA either positively or negatively, depending on the balance between fatigue and potentiation. 6 From this perspective, several studies have been conducted over the

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Matthew S. Palmer, George J.F. Heigenhauser, MyLinh Duong, and Lawrence L. Spriet

This study determined whether mild dehydration influenced skeletal muscle glycogen use, core temperature or performance during high-intensity, intermittent cycle-based exercise in ice hockey players vs. staying hydrated with water. Eight males (21.6 ± 0.4 yr, 183.5 ± 1.6 cm, 83.9 ± 3.7 kg, 50.2 ± 1.9 ml·kg-1·min-1) performed two trials separated by 7 days. The protocol consisted of 3 periods (P) containing 10 × 45-s cycling bouts at ~133% VO2max, followed by 135 s of passive rest. Subjects drank no fluid and dehydrated during the protocol (NF), or maintained body mass by drinking WATER. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately before and after P3. Subjects were mildly dehydrated (-1.8% BM) at the end of P3 in the NF trial. There were no differences between the NF and WATER trials for glycogen use (P1+P2; 350.1 ± 31.9 vs. 413.2 ± 33.2, P3; 103.5 ± 16.2 vs. 131.5 ± 18.9 mmol·kg dm-1), core temperature (P1; 37.8 ± 0.1 vs. 37.7 ± 0.1, P2; 38.2 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1, P3; 38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 38.2 ± 0.1 °C) or performance (P1; 156.3 ± 7.8 vs. 154.4 ± 8.2, P2; 150.5 ± 7.8 vs. 152.4 ± 8.3, P3; 144.1 ± 8.7 vs. 148.4 ± 8.7 kJ). This study demonstrated that typical dehydration experienced by ice hockey players (~1.8% BM loss), did not affect glycogen use, core temperature, or voluntary performance vs. staying hydrated by ingesting water during a cycle-based simulation of ice hockey exercise in a laboratory environment.

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Daniel Boullosa, Marco Beato, Antonio Dello Iacono, Francisco Cuenca-Fernández, Kenji Doma, Moritz Schumann, Alessandro Moura Zagatto, Irineu Loturco, and David G. Behm

a lack of increased voluntary performance would be more apparent in the case of the following descriptor: “Post low-intensity squats jump potentiation in sedentary males.” In this case, the conditioning activity and population are less likely to induce and experience potentiation, respectively

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Daniel Boullosa, Marco Beato, Antonio Dello Iacono, Francisco Cuenca-Fernández, Kenji Doma, Moritz Schumann, Alessandro Moura Zagatto, Irineu Loturco, and David G. Behm

phosphorylation during a very short period of time (<5 min). Conversely, PAPE would be associated with increases in voluntary performance, primarily as a consequence of other potential mechanisms (eg, temperature, water content) over longer time windows (>5 min). 10 While the authors believe this recent proposal

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Erin Calaine Inglis, Danilo Iannetta, Louis Passfield, and Juan M. Murias

, blood lactate concentration [BLa], oxygen uptake [ V ˙ O 2 ]), instead they rely on the maximal voluntary performance. In cycling, power meters are commonly used for monitoring the cyclist’s work rate, and it can be used to measure performance during field-test protocols. Specifically, a popular approach among

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Neil Armstrong

maximal voluntary performance as a function of willingness and capability to transport body mass (including fat mass) in “a progressive exercise test involving continuous running between two lines 20 m apart in time to recorded beeps” ( 32 , p. 1) and not a physiological measure of CRF. It is readily