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Sarahjane Belton, Gavin Breslin, Stephen Shannon, Wesley O’Brien, Ben Fitzpatrick, Tandy Haughey, Fiona Chambers, Danielle Powell, Darryl McCullagh and Deirdre Brennan

on the patterns of PA participation of younger children during specific time periods is needed. 7 A number of international studies are worthy of note in this regard and are discussed below. Using principal components analysis (PCA), Trost et al 8 found that adolescents (12–16 y) weekday and

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Peng Zhang, Jung Eun Lee, David F. Stodden and Zan Gao

weekdays versus weekends and during-school versus after-school PA behaviors in children and adolescents to explore the patterns of PA in specific time segments and comparisons of PA and sedentary behavior time. Specific patterns of PA noted from previous studies include the following: (1) MVPA in children

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Simon Marshall, Jacqueline Kerr, Jordan Carlson, Lisa Cadmus-Bertram, Ruth Patterson, Kari Wasilenko, Katie Crist, Dori Rosenberg and Loki Natarajan

The purpose of this study was to compare estimates of sedentary time on weekdays vs. weekend days in older adults and determine if these patterns vary by measurement method. Older adults (N = 230, M = 83.5, SD = 6.5 years) living in retirement communities completed a questionnaire about sedentary behavior and wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for seven days. Participants engaged in 9.4 (SD = 1.5) hr per day of accelerometer-measured sedentary time, but self-reported engaging in 11.4 (SD = 4.9) hr per day. Men and older participants had more accelerometer-measured sedentary time than their counterparts. The difference between accelerometer-measured weekday and weekend sedentary time was nonsignificant. However, participants self-reported 1.1 hr per day more sedentary time on weekdays compared with weekend days. Findings suggest self-reported but not accelerometer-measured sedentary time should be investigated separately for weekdays and weekend days, and that self-reports may overestimate sedentary time in older adults.

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Stuart J. Fairclough, Nicola D. Ridgers and Gregory Welk

Background:

Vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) may confer superior health benefits for children compared to moderate-intensity physical activity (MPA), but the correlates of MPA and VPA may differ. The study purpose was to investigate associations between selected enabling, predisposing, and demographic physical activity correlates, and MPA and VPA during weekdays and at weekends.

Methods:

Data were gathered from 175 children (aged 10 to 11 years). MPA and VPA were assessed using accelerometers. Correlates were measured at child and school levels. Multilevel analyses identified correlates that significantly predicted MPA and VPA.

Results:

Gender significantly predicted weekday MPA (P < .001), and weekend MPA (P = .022) and VPA (P = .035). Weekday VPA was predicted by gender (P < .001), indices of multiple deprivation score (P < .003), BMI (P = .018), and school playground area (P = .046).

Conclusions:

Gender was the most significant correlate of MPA and VPA. Children most likely to engage in weekday VPA were boys with lower deprivation scores and BMI values, with access to larger playground areas.

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Jung Eun Lee, David F. Stodden and Zan Gao

Background:

Few studies have examined young children’s leisure- and school-based energy expenditure (EE) and moderateto-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The purpose of this study was to explore children’s estimated EE rates and time spent in MVPA in 3 time segments: at-school, after-school, and weekends.

Methods:

A total of 187 second and third grade children from 2 elementary schools participated in the study. Accelerometers were used to assess children’s 5-day EE and MVPA. Multiple 2 (Grade) × 2 (Gender) ANOVAs with repeated measures (Time) were conducted to examine the differences in the outcome variables.

Results:

Significant time effects on EE and MVPA were revealed. Children’s EE rate and minutes in MVPA per day were higher during after school and weekends than at school.

Conclusions:

Although children were more active outside of school, their MVPA during weekdays and weekends still fell far short of the recommended level of 60 minutes/day.

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Evelin Lätt, Jarek Mäestu and Jaak Jürimäe

-aged children have higher activity on weekdays compared with weekend days, 14 which could also result in different sedentary 10 , 15 or MVPA bout accumulation. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that different bout accumulation pattern (longer vs shorter bouts) might have different associations on

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Alexandra Valencia-Peris, Joan Úbeda-Colomer, Jorge Lizandra, Carmen Peiró-Velert and José Devís-Devís

develop evidence-based intervention programs, including active gaming as a suitable alternative for promoting physical activity. Therefore in order to advance public health interventions, more epidemiological studies are necessary to know the role that other variables, such as type of day (weekday or

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Kelly A. Mackintosh, Nicola D. Ridgers, Rachel E. Evans and Melitta A. McNarry

worn the ActiGraph for at least 3 days, which has been shown to have a reliability coefficient of 0.7. 30 PAL are reported for overall, weekdays, and weekend days separately. Patterns of sedentary time and PA accumulation were also calculated. Breaks in sedentary time were defined as the number of

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Claudia O. Alberico, J. Aaron Hipp and Rodrigo S. Reis

(8 AM, 11 AM, 2 PM, and 5 PM), 31 with 1 round of observation every 15 minutes (eg, 8:00, 8:15, 8:30, and 8:45). This equals a total of 64 scans per FZ target area. Selection of weekdays and weekend days and time of the day aimed at targeting different types of users. 9 Data collection was

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Sergio Estrada-Tenorio, José A. Julián, Alberto Aibar, José Martín-Albo and Javier Zaragoza

using the ActiLife software (version .21;  Pensacola, FL). Before further processing, an activity recording of 10-hour wear time per day, for at least 4 days (3 weekdays plus 1 weekend day), was required as inclusion criterion. 27 Nonwear time was defined as a period of 10 consecutive minutes