Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "weight category sports" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ben-El Berkovich, Aliza H. Stark, Alon Eliakim, Dan Nemet and Tali Sinai

Rapid weight loss (RWL) or “cutting weight” prior to competition is well documented in weight category sports ( Franchini et al., 2012; Malliaropoulos et al., 2018 ). It is assumed that athletes who weigh the most within a given weight category have a physical advantage over lighter weight

Restricted access

Lewis J. James and Susan M. Shirreffs

Weight categorized athletes use a variety of techniques to induce rapid weight loss (RWL) in the days leading up to weigh in. This study examined the fluid and electrolyte balance responses to 24-hr fluid restriction (FR), energy restriction (ER) and fluid and energy restriction (F+ER) compared with a control trial (C), which are commonly used techniques to induce RWL in weight category sports. Twelve subjects (six male, six female) received adequate energy and water (C) intake, adequate energy and restricted water (~10% of C; FR) intake, restricted energy (~25% of C) and adequate water (ER) intake or restricted energy (~25% of C) and restricted (~10% of C) water intake (F+ER) in a randomized counterbalanced order. Subjects visited the laboratory at 0 hr, 12 hr, and 24 hr for blood and urine sample collection. Total body mass loss was 0.33% (C), 1.88% (FR), 1.97% (ER), and 2.44% (F+ER). Plasma volume was reduced at 24 hr during FR, ER, and F+ER, while serum osmolality was increased at 24 hr for FR and F+ER and was greater at 24 hr for FR compared with all other trials. Negative balances of sodium, potassium, and chloride developed during ER and F+ER but not during C and FR. These results demonstrate that 24 hr fluid and/or energy restriction significantly reduces body mass and plasma volume, but has a disparate effect on serum osmolality, resulting in hypertonic hypohydration during FR and isotonic hypohydration during ER. These findings might be explained by the difference in electrolyte balance between the trials.

Restricted access

Reid Reale, Gary Slater and Louise M. Burke

It is common for athletes in weight-category sports to try to gain a theoretical advantage by competing in weight divisions that are lower than their day-to-day body mass (BM). Weight loss is achieved not only through chronic strategies (body-fat losses) but also through acute manipulations before weigh-in (“making weight”). Both have performance implications. This review focuses on Olympic combat sports, noting that the varied nature of regulations surrounding the weigh-in procedures, weight requirements, and recovery opportunities in these sports provide opportunity for a wider discussion of factors that can be applied to other weight-category sports. The authors summarize previous literature that has examined the performance effects of weightmaking practices before investigating the physiological nature of these BM losses. Practical recommendations in the form of a decision tree are provided to guide the achievement of acute BM loss while minimizing performance decrements.

Restricted access

Reid Reale, Gary Slater, Gregory R. Cox, Ian C. Dunican and Louise M. Burke

the Day 6 countermovement jump posttest than the Day 0 pretest (pooled means; pretest: 45.4 ± 1.3 cm vs. posttest: 47.6 ± 0.8 cm). Discussion This is the first investigation of the effectiveness and safety of “water loading” as a means of manipulating BM in the context of weight-category sports. The

Restricted access

Alon Eliakim

weight in weight category sports (eg, judokas, wrestlers) prior to major championships may prevent an increase in IGF-I and will be associated “only” with a significant return to baseline values ( 17 ). What should be the appropriate decrease of IGF-I levels during heavy training periods, or what should

Restricted access

Reid Reale, Gary Slater and Louise M. Burke

every competitor at the competitions complete the survey; thus, the nonresponders may have biased our results and (2) the reliance on self-reported data. Practical Applications Reviews of optimal approaches to RWL and recovery in weight category sports are available, 2 , 40 yet there is room for

Restricted access

Rachael L. Thurecht and Fiona E. Pelly

competition for athletes in weight category sports. In reality, the distinction between performance, the nutritional content of food, and body weight may not be able to be teased out into distinctive groupings in the athlete population. Limitations Limitations of this study include the environment in which

Restricted access

Louise M. Burke, Graeme L. Close, Bronwen Lundy, Martin Mooses, James P. Morton and Adam S. Tenforde

strategies. In contrast to the rules and culture of most weight-category sports that promote greater reliance on acute dehydration strategies to temporarily achieve competition weigh-in targets ( Reale et al., 2017a ), elements of “weight making” in lightweight rowing may favor a more long-term approach to

Open access

Amy J. Hector and Stuart M. Phillips

HMB. Protein for Performance During Dietary Energy Restriction Many athletes may undergo aggressive weight loss protocols (particularly in weight-category sports) in order to rapidly achieve desired body weight. In a recent review, Fagerberg ( 2017 ) discussed the negative consequences of restricting

Restricted access

Tanya McGuane, Stephen Shannon, Lee-Ann Sharp, Martin Dempster and Gavin Breslin

 al., 2001 ) and supports previous research findings in other weight-category sports ( Baum, 2006 ). Matt described his dependence on the use of dehydration methods: “The sauna I’d use the most and the sweat suits.” The use of passive and active dehydration techniques in horse racing corroborates previous