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Joseph Peters, Ian Rice, and Tyson Bull

This pilot study investigated the relationship between personal and wheelchair factors on skin pressures at the ischial tuberosity in wheelchair basketball players. Seventeen wheelchair basketball players (7 male and 10 female) were evaluated during static and dynamic propulsive conditions while peak pressure index and peak pressure gradient were recorded with an interface pressure mat. The results showed that greater seat dump angles and backrest heights were negatively associated with the peak pressure index. Therapeutic cushion use was moderately associated with a reduced peak pressure gradient. Higher-class players used chair configurations associated with augmented pressure; however, classification status alone was not associated with pressure magnitude. Body mass index was negatively correlated with the static peak pressure gradient at levels approaching significance (p < .10). In conclusion, greater seat dump angles and backrest heights may provide pressure relief, whereas greater body mass index and therapeutic cushion use may reduce pressure gradients.

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Andrea Bundon, Barry S. Mason, and Victoria L. Goosey-Tolfrey

This paper demonstrates how a qualitative methodology can be used to gain novel insights into the demands of wheelchair racing and the impact of particular racing chair configurations on optimal sport performance via engagement with expert users (wheelchair racers, coaches, and manufacturers). We specifically explore how expert users understand how wheels, tires, and bearings impact sport performance and how they engage, implement, or reject evidence-based research pertaining to these components. We identify areas where participants perceive there to be an immediate need for more research especially pertaining to the ability to make individualized recommendations for athletes. The findings from this project speak to the value of a qualitative research design for capturing the embodied knowledge of expert users and also make suggestions for “next step” projects pertaining to wheels, tires, and bearings drawn directly from the comments of participants.

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Jereme Wilroy and Elizabeth Hibberd

this study was to (1) describe the shoulder physical characteristics observed in wheelchair athletics and (2) evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-week intervention program at improving characteristics that increase the risk of the development of shoulder injury. Methods Design A pre

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Danielle Peers, Timothy Konoval, and Rebecca Marsh Naturkach

discursively absent because they are not imagined or welcomed within the program. The inclusion of para-athletes in primarily athletic discourses was also evident on some DSO websites. Global Wheelchair Athletics adopts an entirely elite sport discourse throughout its website, while making it clear that it