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Alexander Allan Wetten, Marijka Batterham, Sze Yen Tan and Linda Tapsell

Background:

With physical inactivity inextricably linked to the increasing prevalence of obesity, there is a need for validated methods that measure free-living energy expenditure (EE) within sedentary environments. While accelerometers enable these measurements, few studies have compared device accuracy in such settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative validity of the Actigraph, RT3 and SenseWear Armband (SWA).

Methods:

Twenty-three (11 male, 12 female) participants (age: 25.3 ± 6.3 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 2.7) wore 3 accelerometers at designated sites during a 4-hour stay in the Whole Room Calorimeter (WRC). Participants performed 2 10-minute bouts of light-intensity exercise (stepping and stationary cycling) and engaged in unstructured sedentary activities. EE estimated by accelerometers was compared with WRC EE derived from measurements of gaseous exchange.

Results:

The Actigraph and SWA both accurately estimated EE during the stepping exercise. EE estimated by the RT3 during stepping was significantly lower than the WRC value (31.2% ± 15.6%, P < .001). All accelerometers underestimated cycling and unstructured activity EE over the trial period (P < .001).

Conclusions:

The Actigraph and SWA are both valid tools for quantifying EE during light-intensity stepping. These results provide further valuable information on how accelerometer devices may be appropriately used.

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Jean Gutierrez, Andrei Gribok, William Rumpler, Avinash Chandran and Loretta DiPietro

Background:

People with a family history of type 2 diabetes have lower energy expenditure (EE) and more obesity than those having no such family history. Resistance exercise (RE) may induce excess postexercise energy expenditure (EPEE) and reduce long-term risk for obesity in this susceptible group.

Purpose:

To determine the effect of RE on EPEE for 15 hr after a single exercise bout in healthy, untrained young men having a family history of type 2 diabetes.

Design:

Seven untrained men (23 ± 1.2 years, BMI 24 ± 1.1) completed a 48-hr protocol in a whole room calorimeter. The first day served as a control day, with a moderate 40-min RE bout occurring on the second day. Differences in postexercise EE were compared with matched periods from the control day for cumulative 15-min intervals (up to 150 min) and 15 hr after the RE bout was completed.

Results:

The most robust difference in EPEE between the experimental and control days was observed in the first 15-min postexercise period (M = 1.4Kcal/min; SD = 0.7; p < .05). No statistically significant differences in EPEE were noted beyond 90-min of continuous measurement.

Conclusions:

Young people with a family history of type 2 diabetes may not show EPEE after a single RE bout when observed for 15 hr after RE and long-term resistance training may be required to promote EPEE.

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Sze Yen Tan, Marijka Batterham and Linda Tapsell

Background:

Knowing the total energy expenditure (TEE) of overweight adults is important for prescribing weight loss interventions. However, objective measurements of TEE may not always be readily available and can be expensive. This study aimed to investigate the validity of RT3 accelerometers in predicting the TEE of sedentary overweight adults, and to identify any sensitivity to anthropometric changes.

Methods:

The analysis used data from a 12-week weight loss study. At baseline and 12-week, TEE was predicted using RT3 accelerometers during whole room calorimeter stays. Bias between 2 methods was compared at and between the baseline and 12-week measurement points. Multiple regression analyses of TEE data were conducted.

Results:

Predicted and measured values for TEE were not different at baseline (P = .677) but were significantly different after weight loss (P = .007). However, the mean bias between methods was small (<100 kcal/d) and was not significantly different between 2 time-points. RT3 activity counts explained an additional 2% of the variation in TEE at 12-week but not at baseline.

Conclusion:

RT3 accelerometers are not sensitive to body composition changes and do not explain variation in TEE of overweight and obese individuals in a sedentary environment.

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Mirko Brandes, Berit Steenbock and Norman Wirsik

dolls. Some studies on EE of preschool children have been performed using a whole-room calorimeter. The practical use and reliability of whole-room calorimetry have been demonstrated by Janssen et al. 16 Compared with our findings, oxygen consumption and METs were slightly lower for sedentary behaviors

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Yvonne G. Ellis, Dylan P. Cliff, Steven J. Howard and Anthony D. Okely

cut-points defined by Pate ( 27 ). Analysis Sample Size Based on the average weight of a child aged 3 to 5 (20.6 kg) and EE values for sedentary and light-intensity PA from our previous whole room calorimeter study in this age group, a sample size of 30 participants would provide 85% power to detect a

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Greg Petrucci Jr., Patty Freedson, Brittany Masteller, Melanna Cox, John Staudenmayer and John Sirard

study compared MS kCal estimates to two criterion measures in two separate conditions. For condition one, MS kCals were compared with whole room calorimeter estimates during a 24-hour simulated free-living day. The room calorimeter protocol called for participants to do desk work, watch TV, housework