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Charlotte Woods, Lesley Glover, and Julia Woodman

indirectly bring about and maintain through his thinking (termed directing) more appropriate muscle tone and balance throughout his whole self. Today we consider directing a type of thinking characterized by embodied attention and awareness, thinking that is largely spatial in nature. Research in sport

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Sarah Zipp, Tavis Smith, and Simon Darnell

can influence an outcome in her life through her own effort ( Coalter & Taylor, 2010 ). Self-efficacy is distinct from its cousin, self-esteem in a very specific way. Although self-esteem refers to one’s perceived worth or value as a whole, self-efficacy narrows in on the specific belief in one

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Tarkington J. Newman, Fernando Santos, António Cardoso, and Paulo Pereira

—grounded in the work of John Dewey, Kurt Hahn, and Kurt Lewin—experiential learning differs from other learning theories (e.g., cognitive, behavioral, and social). Similar to PYD perspective, experiential learning offers a holistic understanding of learning that accounts for one’s whole self (i

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Martin J. Turner, Gillian Aspin, Faye F. Didymus, Rory Mack, Peter Olusoga, Andrew G. Wood, and Richard Bennett

(little i), but rating her whole self is not possible because humans are too complex (Big I). I also use case examples from the real world to demonstrate the fallibility of global self-rating. For example, I reason that all athletes are capable of success and failure, but no athlete can be rated as a

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Laura Swettenham and Amy E. Whitehead

( Irwin, Hanton, & Kerwin, 2004 ). Within-sport, reflective practice has been defined as a purposeful and complex process that facilitates the examination of experience by questioning the whole self and our agency within the context of practice. This examination transforms experience into learning, which

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Jacqueline McDowell, Yung-Kuei Huang, and Arran Caza

the investment of one’s whole self in a role; the engaged individual devotes great cognitive, emotional, and physical energy toward acting in a role ( Kahn, 1992 ; Rich, LePine, & Crawford, 2010 ). Engaged individuals are described as being “psychologically present, fully there, attentive, feeling

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Amber D. Mosewich, Catherine M. Sabiston, Kent C. Kowalski, Patrick Gaudreau, and Peter R.E. Crocker

resulted in better coping efficacy and less perceived stress ( Sirois, Molnar, & Hirsch, 2015 ). Taken as a whole, self-compassion appears to be associated with appraisal processes, but again, the relations in the sport context are unknown. Self-compassion may also have direct connections to stress

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Cassidy Preston, Veronica Allan, Lauren Wolman, and Jessica Fraser-Thomas

process that facilitates the examination of experience by questioning the whole self and agency within the context of practice. This examination transforms experience into learning, which helps us to access, make sense of and develop our knowledge-in-action in order to better understand and/or improve