Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 53 items for :

  • "whole-body vibration" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Gregory Severino, Marcos Sanchez-Gonzalez, Michelle Walters-Edwards, Michael Nordvall, Oksana Chernykh, Jason Adames and Alexei Wong

postmenopausal women have difficulty adhering to traditional exercise programs and/or may stop exercising altogether ( Guérin & Fortier, 2012 ; O’Neill & Reid, 1991 ). It is crucial to address these barriers by implementing novel modalities such as whole-body vibration training (WBVT). WBVT has been used as an

Restricted access

Dong-Sung Choi, Hwang-Jae Lee, Yong-II Shin, Ahee Lee, Hee-Goo Kim and Yun-Hee Kim

Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been used to increase muscle strength 1 , 2 and muscle activation 3 , 4 and to improve muscle architectural properties, 5 gait ability, 6 and muscle oxygenation. 7 In addition, vibration has shown many positive effects on the human body in rehabilitation and

Restricted access

Karinna Sonálya Aires da Costa, Daniel Tezoni Borges, Liane de Brito Macedo, Caio Alano de Almeida Lins and Jamilson Simões Brasileiro

. 3 In this case, the return to functional activity is strongly correlated with the ability of the quadriceps femoris muscles to generate. 3 Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been increasingly used in rehabilitation of these patients. These devices produce constant vibrations creating symmetrical waves

Restricted access

Dana M. Otzel, Chris J. Hass, Erik A. Wikstrom, Mark D. Bishop, Paul A. Borsa and Mark D. Tillman

return to preinjury activity levels, not all sensorimotor deficits may be vanquished using these techniques. 2 Whole-body vibration (WBV) could potentially address the neurophysiologic deficits accompanied by CAI including deficits in strength, proprioception, postural control, and reflex activity. WBV

Restricted access

Borja Muniz-Pardos, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alex González-Agüero, Alba Gómez-Cabello, José A. Casajús and Germán Vicente-Rodríguez

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is an oscillatory training method widely used in sports centers. 1 This protocol has been described as the sinusoidal oscillations produced by industrial machines which are transmitted to the human body, enhancing the tonic vibration reflex that stimulates reflex muscle

Restricted access

Nuttaset Manimmanakorn, Jenny J. Ross, Apiwan Manimmanakorn, Samuel J.E. Lucas and Michael J. Hamlin

Purpose:

To compare whole-body vibration (WBV) with traditional recovery protocols after a high-intensity training bout.

Methods:

In a randomized crossover study, 16 athletes performed 6 × 30-s Wingate sprints before completing either an active recovery (10 min of cycling and stretching) or WBV for 10 min in a series of exercises on a vibration platform. Muscle hemodynamics (assessed via near-infrared spectroscopy) were measured before and during exercise and into the 10-min recovery period. Blood lactate concentration, vertical jump, quadriceps strength, flexibility, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), muscle soreness, and performance during a single 30-s Wingate test were assessed at baseline and 30 and 60 min postexercise. A subset of participants (n = 6) completed a 3rd identical trial (1 wk later) using a passive 10-min recovery period (sitting).

Results:

There were no clear effects between the recovery protocols for blood lactate concentration, quadriceps strength, jump height, flexibility, RPE, muscle soreness, or single Wingate performance across all measured recovery time points. However, the WBV recovery protocol substantially increased the tissue-oxygenation index compared with the active (11.2% ± 2.4% [mean ± 95% CI], effect size [ES] = 3.1, and –7.3% ± 4.1%, ES = –2.1 for the 10 min postexercise and postrecovery, respectively) and passive recovery conditions (4.1% ± 2.2%, ES = 1.3, 10 min postexercise only).

Conclusion:

Although WBV during recovery increased muscle oxygenation, it had little effect in improving subsequent performance compared with a normal active recovery.

Restricted access

Tülay Çevik Saldıran, Emine Atıcı, Derya Azim Rezaei, Özgül Öztürk, Burcu Uslu, Burcu Ateş Özcan and Begüm Okudan

researches, it was observed that the effects of exercise training on flexibility, muscle strength, or performance were provided by whole-body vibration (WBV) training alone. 6 , 7 It was dynamometrically 8 and electromyographically shown 9 that WBV provides an increase in muscle strength, 10 flexibility

Restricted access

Francisco Alvarez-Barbosa, Jesús del Pozo-Cruz, Borja del Pozo-Cruz, Antonio García-Hermoso and Rosa María Alfonso-Rosa

poorer mobility and balance compared with older people still living in the community ( Nitz & Josephson, 2011 ). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as an easy and safe alternative to conventional exercise for frail people, because it minimizes the need for conscious exertion and stress on the

Restricted access

Heon-Jeong Kim and Bernard J. Martin

Simulation of human movements is an essential component for proactive ergonomic analysis and biomechanical model development (Chaffin, 2001). Most studies on reach kinematics have described human movements in a static environment, however the models derived from these studies cannot be applied to the analysis of human reach movements in vibratory environments such as in-vehicle operations. This study analyzes three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper extremity in reach movements performed in static and specific vibratory conditions and investigates vibration transmission to shoulder, elbow, and hand along the body path during pointing tasks. Thirteen seated subjects performed reach movements to five target directions distributed in their right hemisphere. The results show similarities in the characteristics of movement patterns and reach trajectories of upper body segments for static and dynamic environments. In addition, vibration transmission through upper body segments is affected by vibration frequency, direction, and location of the target to be reached. Similarities in the pattern of movement trajectories revealed by filtering vibration-induced oscillations indicate that coordination strategy may not be drastically different in static and vibratory environments. This finding may facilitate the development of active biodynamic models to predict human performance and behavior under whole body vibration exposure.

Restricted access

Bent R. Rønnestad, Gunnar Slettaløkken Falch and Stian Ellefsen

Postactivation-potentiation exercise with added whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a potential way to acutely improve sprint performance. In cycling, there are many competitions and situations where sprinting abilities are important.

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of adding WBV to warm-up procedures on subsequent cycle sprint performance.

Methods:

Eleven well-trained cyclists participated in the study. All cyclists performed a familiarization session before 2 separate test sessions in randomized order. Each session included a standardized warm-up followed by 1 of the following preconditioning exercises: 30 s of half-squats without WBV or 30 s of half-squats with WBV at 40 Hz. A 15-s Wingate sprint was performed 1 min after the preconditioning exercise.

Results:

Performing preconditioning exercise with WBV at 40 Hz resulted in superior peak power output compared with preconditioning exercise without WBV (1413 ± 257 W vs 1353 ± 213 W, P = .04) and a tendency toward superior mean power output during a 15-second all-out sprint (850 ± 119 W vs 828 ± 101 W, P = .08). Effect sizes showed a moderate practical effect of WBV vs no WBV on both peak and mean power output.

Conclusions:

Preconditioning exercise performed with WBV at 40 Hz seems to have a positive effect on cycling sprint performance in young well-trained cyclists. This suggests that athletes can incorporate body-loaded squats with WBV in preparations to specific sprint training to improve the quality of the sprint training and also to improve sprint performance in relevant competitions.