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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Matt R. Huml and Marlene A. Dixon

model, workaholism and its potential to add value to existing sport management literature is explained. Then, the concepts of burnout and work–family conflict (WFC), particularly within a sport context, are reviewed and their relationship to workaholism is stipulated. Theoretical Framework Workaholism

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Jennifer E. Bruening and Marlene A. Dixon

The current study examined, via online focus groups, the consequences of work–family conflict at work and at home with 41 mothers who are Division I head coaches. In addition, the authors focused on the coping mechanisms that these women used to achieve success at work and quality of life with family. Results revealed that work–family conflict influenced outcomes with work (e.g., staffing patterns, relationships with athletes, team performance), family (e.g., time spent and relationships with children and spouses or partners), and life (e.g., guilt and exhaustion, balance and perspective, weaving work and family). Coping mechanisms included stress relief, self-awareness, organization and time management, sacrificing aspects of work, support networks, flexibility with hours, and family-friendly policies and cultures. Implications are that the women work to promote change within their circle of influence. Although their efforts might not result in actual policy changes, over which they feel limited control, they might result in changes in perceptions and attitudes.

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Marlene A. Dixon and Jennifer E. Bruening

As numerous qualified women exit the workforce because of the challenges of balancing work and family, investigations of the work–family interface have become increasingly important. Research has indicated how multilevel factors (i.e., individual, organizational, and sociocultural) play a role in work–family conflict. Little research has examined these factors in relation to each other, however. In sport management, Dixon and Bruening (2005) argued that higher level factors (sociocultural and organizational) shape and constrain lower level behaviors (organizational and individual), which ultimately influence the perception and consequences of work–family conflict. The primary purpose of this investigation is to test and further develop Dixon and Bruening’s multilevel framework. The current study used online focus groups for data collection from 41 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I female head coaches with children to examine the factors that impacted work–family conflict from a top-down perspective. The results illuminated the experiences of the coaching mothers and the factors that affected their job and life satisfaction at each of the three levels. Particular attention was paid to how higher level factors such as work climate and culture shaped and constrained lower level attitudes and behaviors such as individual conflict and time management. These relationships highlighted how individual attitudes and behaviors reflect larger structural and social forces at work, and not simply individual choices.

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Stephanie M. Mazerolle and Jennifer E. Bruening

Column-editor : James M. Mensch

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Stephanie M. Mazerolle and Jennifer E. Bruening

Column-editor : James M. Mensch

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Christianne M. Eason, Stephanie M. Singe and Kelsey Rynkiewicz

Work–family conflict (WFC) is an area of interest that has been studied extensively in the athletic trainer population, with a focus on causes and consequences. 1 – 5 Conflict can be described as an incompatibility between two or more opinions, interests, or roles. The demands associated with the

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Jeff Alexander Graham and Marlene A. Dixon

The work-family interface continues to be an important research area as the positive (Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006; Greenhaus & Powell, 2006; Parasuraman & Greenhaus, 2002; Sieber, 1974) and negative (Duxbury, Lyons, & Higgins, 2011; Frone, Russell, & Barnes, 1996; Greenhaus & Parasuraman, 1999; Kahn, Wolfe, Quinn, Snoek, & Rosenthal, 1964; Mullen, Kelley, & Kelloway, 2011; Netemeyer, Boles, & McMurrian, 1996) consequences of successfully balancing work and family have implications for both individuals and organizations. Within sport management, most research has focused on issues surrounding the work-family interface of coaching mothers (Bruening & Dixon, 2007; Dixon & Bruening, 2005, 2007; Dixon & Sagas, 2007; Schenewark & Dixon, 2012; Palmer & Leberman, 2009). Recent research outside of sport management suggests that fathers also perceive tension between work and family (Galinsky, Aumann, & Bond, 2011; Harrington, Van Deusen, & Humberd, 2011; Parker & Wang, 2013). Therefore, this article examines the work-family interface of coaching fathers, with a focus on the further development of a research agenda.

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D. James 7 2007 21 3 319 337 10.1123/jsm.21.3.319 Research Determinants of Interorganizational Relationships: The Case of a Canadian Nonprofit Sport Organization Kathy Babiak * 7 2007 21 3 338 376 10.1123/jsm.21.3.338 Work–Family Conflict in Coaching I: A Top-Down Perspective Marlene A. Dixon

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Management and Marketing Work–Family Conflict in Coaching II: Managing Role Conflict Jennifer E. Bruening * Marlene A. Dixon * 10 2007 21 4 471 496 10.1123/jsm.21.4.471 Research Social Identity and Brand Equity Formation: A Comparative Study of Collegiate Sports Fans Brett A. Boyle * Peter

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ARTICLES Workaholism in Sport: A Mediated Model of Work–Family Conflict and Burnout Elizabeth A. Taylor * Matt R. Huml * Marlene A. Dixon * 33 4 249 260 10.1123/jsm.2018-0248 jsm.2018-0248 Human Capital Ecosystem Construction in an Emerging Rugby Market Christopher M. McLeod * Calvin Nite