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Guadalupe X. Ayala, Amy Gammelgard, James F. Sallis and John. P. Elder

Background:

Studies have examined the association between work-related characteristics and physical activity participation; however few studies include U.S. Latinos.

Methods:

Six hundred and seventy two Latino adults of San Diego County were randomly sampled and surveyed to assess their health behaviors in the fall of 2006. Analyses were conducted with 633 respondents with physical activity data (94% of sample), examining the extent to which job category and hours worked per week were associated with 4 domains of physical activity defined by MET-minutes per week using the long IPAQ.

Results:

Multivariate analysis of variance models were computed. After adjusting for covariates, occupational MET-minutes per week were associated with job category and hours worked per week, such that blue collar workers expended more MET-minutes per week than white collar or nonworkers, and those who worked 20 hours a week or less expended less occupational physical activity compared with those who worked more than 20 hours per week. In addition, nonworkers reported expending more household MET-minutes per week than blue collar or white collar workers.

Conclusions:

Efforts are needed to increase the physical activity levels of Mexican immigrants/Mexican-Americans, with interventions designed in consideration of the individual’s work status.

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Lydia Kwak, Maria Hagströmer and Michael Sjostrom

Background:

To be able to draw any conclusions regarding the health effects of occupational physical activity (OPA), more information is needed regarding valid measures to assess OPA. Aims were to compare OPA as assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long version (IPAQ-L) with OPA assessed with an accelerometer and to assess the contribution of OPA to total PA.

Methods:

Working adults (n = 441; mean age = 49.4 yrs; 44% males) wore an accelerometer for 7 days in free-living situations and completed the IPAQ-L. Comparisons were made between IPAQ-L-work and accelerometer data limited to working time (Moderate and Vigorous PA (accelerometer-MVPA-work) and average intensity). Subgroup analyses were performed.

Results:

Spearman correlation was r = .46 (P < .01) between IPAQ-L-work and accelerometer-MVPA-work. Correlations ranged from r = .27 to r = .55 in respectively obese and overweight subjects. The contribution of IPAQ-L-work to IPAQ-total was 24.7%.

Conclusions:

The IPAQ-L work domain is a moderately good measure of time spent on MVPA at work and can be used to assess the contribution of OPA to total PA. This study provides valuable information regarding the use of the IPAQ-L in assessing work domain specific PA, and underscores the importance of assessing OPA, as it can contribute for a substantial part to total PA.

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Michelle M. Yore, Heather R. Bowles, Barbara E. Ainsworth, Caroline A. Macera and Harold W. Kohl III

Background:

In 2002, the National Physical Activity and Weight Loss Survey asked two sets of questions on occupational physical activity—one question from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and eight detailed questions from the occupational physical activity questionnaire (OPAQ). This study compares the responses.

Methods:

On the basis of percentage of occupational physical activity reported on OPAQ, 5847 respondents were classified by three levels (sitting or standing, walking, and heavy labor). Kappa, MET-min per day, and median hours worked at the three levels were calculated to compare the two sets of questions.

Results:

Levels of occupational physical activity reported on the BRFSS question agreed with OPAQ (kappa = 0.56). Hours of heavy labor per day reported on OPAQ increased among the three activity levels on BRFSS.

Conclusions:

The BRFSS question and OPAQ classify respondents similarly by occupational physical activity. The BRFSS question is useful for overview and OPAQ, for more detailed analyses.

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Drue Stapleton

Clinical Scenario Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) are musculoskeletal and connective tissue conditions in which the “work environment and performance of work contribute significantly” and/or are exacerbated or “persist longer due to work conditions.” 1 Overexertion, repetitive motion

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Heontae Kim and Minsoo Kang

determine the C coefficient between the SBR and accelerometer measures. The modified SBR includes sleep, three main domains (work-related sitting, non-work-related sitting, and transport), and choices between different activities under each domain. These activities include (1) non-work-related sitting

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Jon Welty Peachey, Laura Burton, Janelle Wells and Mi Ryoung Chung

. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore how servant leadership influences followers’ work-related needs satisfaction within the SDP field. This research is significant and consistent with the focus of this special issue, as we adopt a follower-centered perspective on leadership ( Uhl

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Areeya Jirathananuwat and Krit Pongpirul

workplace, 2 a better understanding of PA during work hours is essential for reducing physical inactivity. The US Physical Activity Guidelines 3 recognized that “some physical activity is better than none.” To explore work-related PA, studies usually dichotomize occupations into blue collar—those perform

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Carrie S. Baker and Gary B. Wilkerson

lower work-related stress and level of job dissatisfaction than ATs that work in a TM. When comparing the results of this study to those posted on the ICSM website (n = 114), an even greater average stress score of 47.79 has been reported by ATs at comparable institutions without model specification. 19

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TaeYeong Kim, JaeHyuk Lee, SeJun Oh, Seungmin Kim and BumChul Yoon

back pain disability questionnaire; RMD, Roland–Morris disability questionnaire; SHR, simulated horseback riding; STB, stabilization. Note: Data are presented as mean (SD). There was a statistically significant interaction between the effects of exercise and their duration on work-related FABQ ( F

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Junxin Li, Binbin Yang, Miranda Varrasse, Xiaopeng Ji, MaoChun Wu, Manman Li and Kun Li

promote sleep ( Reid et al., 2010 ; Yang, Ho, Chen, & Chien, 2012 ) and other aspects of physical health in older adults ( Yang et al., 2012 ). Nonexercise activity, such as household and work-related activity, may be particularly relevant in older adults as the ability and interest to engage in formal