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Danielle Rousseau, Kimberleigh Weiss-Lewit and Mark Lilly

Yoga is a complex body of practice, lineage, and community and while the yoga community is one of connection, growth, and mutual support in the broadest sense, it has not been immune to the pervasive sexual violence that is coming to light across our society. In addressing the position of yoga

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Megan Colletto and Nancy Rodriguez

; Paddon-Jones & Rasmussen, 2009 ). Physical activity, strength training in particular, improves whole body protein balance (WBPB) in older individuals ( Timmerman et al., 2012 ; Walker et al., 2011 ). Of significance to this investigation is the potential of yoga as an alternative exercise option for the

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Bethany Forseth and Stacy D. Hunter

Traditional yoga practices originated in India a few thousand years ago 1 and involve engagement in 8 limbs, or focuses, of the practice that include yama (restraint), niyama (observance), asana (physical poses), pranayama (breathing techniques), pratyahara (preparation for meditation), dharana

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Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Richard F. MacLehose, Allison W. Watts, Marla E. Eisenberg, Melissa N. Laska and Nicole Larson

rates of engagement in, and responsiveness to, standard weight management, 4 , 16 and there are few effective weight gain prevention strategies currently available for young adults. 4 Yoga is a practice that involves physical movement, strengthening and stretching activities, focused breathing

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Soubhagyalaxmi Mohanty, Balaram Pradhan and Alex Hankey

Yoga is an ancient Indian knowledge using holistic mind–body practices to maintain health ( Salmon, Lush, Jablonski, & Sephton, 2009 ). The United Nations General Assembly declared June 21 as the International Day of Yoga (IDY) in 2015, and since that time, awareness of yoga’s practice has spread

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J. Luke Pryor, Brittany Christensen, Catherine G. R. Jackson and Stephanie Moore-Reed

pain and discomfort while meeting metabolic demands consistent with physical activity recommendations may be part of the solution for physical activity engagement, and long-term adherence and compliance in sedentary, obese individuals. Yoga is an increasingly popular form of physical activity, which

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Sylvia E. Badon, Alyson J. Littman, K.C. Gary Chan, Michelle A. Williams and Daniel A. Enquobahrie

activity among pregnant women, with 41% of pregnant women in the United States reporting walking during pregnancy. 2 Walking during pregnancy is associated with decreased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus, 10 preeclampsia, 11 and inadequate/excessive gestational weight gain. 12 , 13 Yoga has been

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Sally A. Sherman, Renee J. Rogers, Kelliann K. Davis, Ryan L. Minster, Seth A. Creasy, Nicole C. Mullarkey, Matthew O’Dell, Patrick Donahue and John M. Jakicic

Background:

Whether the energy cost of vinyasa yoga meets the criteria for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity has not been established.

Purpose:

To compare energy expenditure during acute bouts of vinyasa yoga and 2 walking protocols.

Methods:

Participants (20 males, 18 females) performed 60-minute sessions of vinyasa yoga (YOGA), treadmill walking at a self-selected brisk pace (SELF), and treadmill walking at a pace that matched the heart rate of the YOGA session (HR-Match). Energy expenditure was assessed via indirect calorimetry.

Results:

Energy expenditure was significantly lower in YOGA compared with HR-Match (difference = 79.5 ± 44.3 kcal; P < .001) and SELF (difference = 51.7 ± 62.6 kcal; P < .001), but not in SELF compared with HR-Match (difference = 27.8 ± 72.6 kcal; P = .054). A similar pattern was observed for metabolic equivalents (HR-Match = 4.7 ± 0.8, SELF = 4.4 ± 0.7, YOGA = 3.6 ± 0.6; P < .001). Analyses using only the initial 45 minutes from each of the sessions, which excluded the restorative component of YOGA, showed energy expenditure was significantly lower in YOGA compared with HR-Match (difference = 68.0 ± 40.1 kcal; P < .001) but not compared with SELF (difference = 15.1 ± 48.7 kcal; P = .189).

Conclusions:

YOGA meets the criteria for moderate-intensity physical activity. Thus, YOGA may be a viable form of physical activity to achieve public health guidelines and to elicit health benefits.

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Rachel Martin, Ivanka Prichard, Amanda D. Hutchinson and Carlene Wilson

This study examined the potential mediating roles of mindfulness and body awareness in the relationship between exercise and eating behavior. Female exercisers (N = 159) recruited from fitness centers, yoga centers, and the community completed a questionnaire incorporating measures of exercise behavior, body awareness, trait mindfulness, mindful eating, dietary intake, and disordered eating symptoms. Participation in yoga was associated with significantly lower disordered eating (mediated by body awareness), whereas the amount of time spent participating in cardio-based exercise was associated with greater eating disturbance. The relationships between amount of exercise and actual food intake were not mediated by trait mindfulness or body awareness. The differential findings for dietary intake and disordered eating indicate that the body awareness cultivated in different forms of exercise may be more beneficial for clinical populations or those at risk for eating disorders than for modifying actual dietary intake in the general population.

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Rameswar Pal, Som Nath Singh, Kaushik Halder, Omveer Singh Tomer, Awadh Bihari Mishra and Mantu Saha

Background:

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of yogic practice on resting metabolism and redox status.

Methods:

The study was conducted on 64 physically trained male volunteers selected randomly at the Air Force Academy. The yoga group (n = 34) practiced yogasana, pranayama, and meditation for 3 months (February–May 2011) and the control group (n = 30) performed physical training. Antioxidant variables in blood samples along with physiological parameters were estimated before and after 3 months.

Results:

No significant difference was noted between baseline data of the control group and yoga group. Reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E; the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione; and total antioxidant status were increased significantly following yogic practice. Activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase were significantly increased, whereas activity of glutathione peroxidase was significantly decreased following yogic practice. Oxidized glutathione decreased significantly following yogic practice. A nonsignificant decrease of hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and blood sugar was noted in the yoga group. Carbon dioxide elimination and peripheral oxygen saturation increased significantly following yogic practice. No significant changes were observed in the control group following 3 months of physical training.

Conclusions:

Regular yogic practice can improve resting metabolism and redox status of the practitioner.