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Judit Balogh and Gabriella Trzaskoma-Bicsérdy

sport participation should be emphasised. Coaches—especially youth coaches—are first and foremost educators, who build their athletes’ character through performance enhancement. On the other hand, to reach athletes’ full potential, coaches need to point out pedagogical aspects as well. Participating in

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Bradley Fawver, Garrett F. Beatty, John T. Roman and Kevin Kurtz

interpersonal and psychological skills necessary to be a high-quality coach. In an effort to provide clarity and context to these issues, the primary aims of this insights paper are as follows: (a) review the status of current youth coach training in the United States, (b) identify strengths and weaknesses in

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Fernando Santos, Daniel Gould and Leisha Strachan

study to analyze the impact of a transformational leadership training program for youth coaches on athletes’ perceptions of transformational leadership and found higher rates of perceived transformational leadership behavior after the intervention. Hence, a coach-centered paradigm has dominated research

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Cliffy Gayle and Darlene Kluka

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Edel Langan, John Toner, Catherine Blake and Chris Lonsdale

We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) to test the effects of a self-determination theory-based intervention on athlete motivation and burnout. In addition, we examined the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. We randomly assigned youth Gaelic football coaches (N = 6) and their teams to an experimental or a delayed treatment control group (n = 3 each group). We employed linear mixed modeling to analyze changes in player motivation and burnout as a result of their coach participating in a 12-week SDT-based intervention. In addition, we conducted a fidelity assessment to examine whether the intervention was implemented as planned. The findings demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a self-determination theory-based intervention in the coaching domain. In addition, this study demonstrated favorable trends in the quality of player motivation and burnout symptoms as a result of an SDT-based intervention.

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Zenzi Huysmans, Damien Clement, Robert Hilliard and Adam Hansell

Within the youth sport context, coaches take on many different roles and responsibilities. Youth coaches are, first and foremost, responsible for performance outcomes and teaching sport-specific physical, tactical, and technical skills ( International Council for Coaching Excellence, Association of

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Cassidy Preston and Jessica Fraser-Thomas

delayed or withheld feedback; this has been found to be particularly common for someone like myself in a position of authority ( Larson, 1989 ). However, the positive outcomes I experienced after successfully providing change-oriented feedback highlight the importance of elite youth coaches’ being honest

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Fernando Santos, Nuno Corte-Real, Leonor Regueiras, Leisha Strachan, Cláudia Dias and António Fonseca

Over the last decades positive development (PD) has served as a framework for several investigations within the sport science community. In fact, multiple researchers have analyzed youth coaches’ role in PD. However, there is recent interest in exploring high performance coaching due to the complexity of the coaching practice, the different developmental needs presented by players, and the relevance of PD within this particular environment. The purpose of this study was to understand the perspectives of Portuguese football coaches about the importance of PD in high performance coaching. The participants in the study were ten male Portuguese football coaches who trained athletes between the ages of 16 and 39 years of age. Findings showed that coaches viewed winning and on field performance as top priorities in their coaching philosophy, but recognized the importance of PD. Coaches also envisioned the determinant role youth coaches have in this domain. Coaches conceptualized PD as an overarching framework that could be used across the developmental spectrum to convey a range of PD outcomes in high performance contexts such as teamwork, respect for others and transfer to other life domains. Moving forward, coach education courses should help coaches develop strategies to foster PD.

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Nicole M. LaVoi, Erin Becker and Heather D. Maxwell

Given the lack of nationalized and required coach education programs for those involved with youth sports, self-help coaching books are a common source of knowledge. With the exception of critiques of young adult sports fiction (Kane, 1998; Kreigh & Kane, 1997), sport media research has lacked investigation of mediums that impact non-elite youth athletes and adolescent girls, and youth coaches and parents of young female athletes. The purpose of this study is to examine ‘coaching girls’ books–specifically how differences between female and male athletes are constructed. A content analysis was performed on selective chapters within a criterion sampling of six best-selling, self-help ‘coaching girls’ books. Results indicate coaching girls books are written from a perspective of inflated gender difference, and represent a simplified, stereo-typed account of coaching girls. Four first-order themes emerged from analysis: Problematizing Coaching Girls, Girls Constructed As “Other,” Ambivalence, and Sustaining the Gender Binary. Implications of these themes are discussed.