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Salomé Aubert, Joel D. Barnes, Megan L. Forse, Evan Turner, Silvia A. González, Jakub Kalinowski, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Eun-Young Lee, Reginald Ocansey, John J. Reilly, Natasha Schranz, Leigh M. Vanderloo and Mark S. Tremblay

Background: In response to growing concerns over high levels of physical inactivity among young people, the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance developed a series of national Report Cards on physical activity for children and youth to advocate for the promotion of physical activity. This article provides updated evidence of the impact of the Report Cards on powering the movement to get children and youth moving globally. Methods: This assessment was performed using quantitative and qualitative sources of information, including surveys, peer-reviewed publications, e-mails, gray literature, and other sources. Results: Although it is still too early to observe a positive change in physical activity levels among children and youth, an impact on raising awareness and capacity building in the national and international scientific community, disseminating information to the general population and stakeholders, and on powering the movement to get kids moving has been observed. Conclusions: It is hoped that the Report Card activities will initiate a measurable shift in the physical activity levels of children and contribute to achieving the 4 strategic objectives of the World Health Organization Global Action Plan as follows: creating an active society, creating active environments, creating active lives, and creating active systems.

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Jonathan Robertson, Ryan Storr, Andrew Bakos and Danny O’Brien

The aim of this article was to develop a theoretical framework to aid the current understanding of social change practice. Drawing on concepts from institutional theory, the authors proposed and applied a theoretical framework to investigate social change at the intersection of gender and sexuality inclusion in Australian cricket. Qualitative techniques (interviews and document analyses) were utilized to investigate the trajectory of lesbian inclusion in Australian cricket over time. Starting from the perspective that institutional arrangements can be exclusionary (or biased) toward certain groups in society, this research investigated how the actions of institutional entrepreneurs can create more inclusive institutional arrangements. Theoretical and practical implications for future research are discussed.

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Marlene A. Dixon and Per G. Svensson

Sport for development and peace (SDP) agencies increasingly deal with complex institutional demands. In this article, the authors present an in-depth case study of how a nascent SDP organization created from within a local community in Kenya responded to institutional complexity through a series of pivotal moments that shaped the nature of the SDP agency. Throughout the formative stage in its life course, organizational leaders faced increased institutional complexity as they grappled with a series of incompatible prescriptions and demands from multiple institutional logics. The case organization—Highway of Hope—responded to this complexity through a process of organizational hybridity. Five pivotal decision points were identified and analyzed to explore how they shaped the organization over its early stages of existence. Our findings provide guidance for advancing our understanding of hybridity processes in SDP, both theoretically and practically.

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Natalie M. Golaszewski and John B. Bartholomew

Research suggests 5 forms of social support: companionship, emotional, informational, instrumental, and validation. Despite this, existing measures of social support for physical activity are limited to emotional, companionship, and instrumental support. The purpose was to develop the Physical Activity and Social Support Scale (PASSS) with subscales that reflected all 5 forms. Participants (N = 506, mean age = 34.3 yr) who were active at least twice per week completed a 235-item questionnaire assessing physical activity behaviors, social support for physical activity, general social support, and other psychosocial questions. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to develop and validate the PASSS. Exploratory factor analysis supported a 5-factor, 20-item model, χ2(100) = 146.22, p < .05, root mean square error of approximation = .05. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated good fit, Satorra–Bentler χ2(143) = 199.57, p < .001, root mean square error of approximation = .04, comparative-fit index = .97, standardized root mean square residual = .06. Findings support the PASSS to measure all 5 forms for physical activity.

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Sanaz Nosrat, James W. Whitworth, Nicholas J. SantaBarbara, Shira I. Dunsiger and Joseph T. Ciccolo

Depressive symptoms and fatigue are prevalent among people living with human immunodeficiency virus. Resistance exercise is known to stimulate a positive affective response. Objective: To examine the acute psychological effects of resistance-exercise intensity among Black/African-American people living with human immunodeficiency virus and experiencing depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 42 participants were randomized into a moderate- (n = 21) or high-intensity (n = 21) group. Assessments were collected before exercise (PRE), at the midpoint (MID), immediately following (POST) exercise, and 15 (DELAY 15) and 30 (DELAY 30) min after. Results: In the moderate-intensity group, affect improved PRE to POST, PRE to DELAY 15 and DELAY 30, and perceived distress decreased from PRE to all time points. In the high-intensity group, affect declined PRE to MID, and perceived distress decreased PRE to DELAY 15 and DELAY 30. Perceived activation increased PRE to MID, and POST in both groups (ps < .01). Conclusions: The moderate-intensity group compared with the high-intensity group is more effective at improving affect and energy and at reducing distress.

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Mohammad Siahpush, Trish D. Levan, Minh N. Nguyen, Brandon L. Grimm, Athena K. Ramos, Tzeyu L. Michaud and Patrik L. Johansson

Background: The mortality benefits of meeting the US federal guidelines for physical activity, which includes recommendations for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities, have never been examined among smokers. Our aim was to investigate the association between reporting to meet the guidelines and all-cause, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease mortality among smokers. Methods: We pooled data from the 1998–2009 National Health Interview Survey, which were linked to records in the National Death Index (n = 68,706). Hazard ratios (HR) were computed to estimate the effect of meeting the physical activity guidelines on mortality. Results: Smokers who reported meeting the guidelines for physical activity had 29% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62–0.81), 46% lower risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (HR: 0.54; 95% CI, 0.39–0.76), and 26% lower risk of mortality from cancer (HR: 0.74; 95% CI, 0.59–0.93), compared with those who reported meeting neither the aerobic nor the muscle-strengthening recommendations of the guidelines. Meeting the aerobic recommendation of the guidelines was associated with a 42% decline in that risk (HR: 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44–0.77). Conclusion: Smokers who adhere to physical activity guidelines show a significant reduction in mortality.

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Astrid C.J. Balemans, Han Houdijk, Gilbert R. Koelewijn, Marjolein Piek, Frank Tubbing, Anne Visser-Meily and Olaf Verschuren

Background: It is questionable whether postures that are regarded as sedentary behavior in able-bodied persons evoke comparable physiological responses in adults with stroke or cerebral palsy (CP). This study aimed to compare metabolic demand and muscle activity in healthy controls, adults with stroke, and adults with CP during sedentary behavior and light physical activities. Methods: Seventy-one adults (45.6 [18.9] y, range 18–86) participated in this study, of which there were 18 controls, 31 with stroke, and 22 with CP. The metabolic equivalent of task (MET) and level of muscle activation were assessed for different sedentary positions (sitting supported and unsupported) and light physical activities (standing and walking). Results: During sitting supported and unsupported, people with mild to moderate stroke and CP show comparable MET and electromyographic values as controls. While sitting unsupported, people with severe stroke show higher METs and electromyographic values (P < .001), and people with severe CP only show higher METs compared with controls (P < .05) but all below 1.5 METs. Standing increased electromyographic values in people with severe stroke or CP (P < .001) and reached values above 1.5 METs. Conclusions: Physiologic responses during sedentary behavior are comparable for controls and adults with mild to moderate stroke and CP, whereas higher metabolic demands and muscle activity (stroke only) were observed in severely affected individuals.

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Eduardo L. Caputo, Paulo H. Ferreira, Manuela L. Ferreira, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Marlos R. Domingues, Debra Shirley and Marcelo C. Silva

Background: To investigate whether engagement in leisure-time physical activity before or during pregnancy is associated with low back pain (LBP) outcomes during pregnancy and postpartum prevalence of LBP in women who reported LBP during pregnancy. Methods: Data from the 2015 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study, were used. Demographic, socioeconomic, and gestational characteristics, as well as physical activity prior to and during pregnancy were recorded at perinatal assessment. LBP outcomes during pregnancy (pain intensity, activity limitation, and care seeking) and postpartum (prevalence of LBP) were collected at the 1-year follow-up. Results: Pain intensity, care seeking, and prevalence of LBP postpartum period were not associated with physical activity either before or during pregnancy. However, women engaged in physical activity during pregnancy and at least for 2 trimesters had lower odds ratio of activity limitation associated with LBP during pregnancy (odds ratio: 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 0.88; odds ratio: 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.86, respectively). Conclusion: Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity during pregnancy is associated with less activity limitation related to LBP during pregnancy. However, physical activity levels, either before or during pregnancy, were not associated with pain intensity, care seeking, and postpartum LBP.

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Tania Pereira, John Durocher and Jamie Burr

Background: Insufficient physical activity (PA) is associated with numerous chronic diseases and premature mortality, and the challenge of meeting recommended PA guidelines is exacerbated in the winter. Snowmobiling can potentially contribute to PA accumulation, but the objective metabolic and physical demands are unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the physical demands of riding a snowmobile. Methods: Habitual snowmobile riders responded to a survey describing a typical ride (n = 4015). Using this data, terrain-specific testing courses were created, and recreational snowmobile riders (n = 40) participated in a scaled representative ride (21 [8] min) while aerobic metabolism (VO2) and muscular fatigue were quantified. Results: The mean VO2 while riding, irrespective of terrain, was 18.5 (8.4) mL·kg−1·min−1, with significant differences based on geographic location (13.4 [5.2] vs 25.7 [6.6] mL·kg−1·min−1, P < .001). Muscular fatigue was apparent in maximal handgrip (−7% [8%], P < .001) across both riding terrains, but not lower body power, suggesting a greater influence of an upper body strength component. Conclusions: Snowmobiling is an activity that generally falls within the moderate-intensity activity range and involves both aerobic fitness and muscular strength. There were substantial differences in demand between terrains, suggesting that additional benefits may be conferred from mountain riding as it was more metabolically demanding.