Athletic Trainers’ Perceived Challenges Toward Comprehensive Concussion Management in the Secondary School Setting

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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Available financial and personnel resources often dictate the specifics of concussion policies and procedures in the secondary school setting. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore athletic trainers’ perceived challenges toward comprehensive concussion management in the secondary school setting. The findings indicate several challenges exist toward concussion management in the secondary school, including facility, personnel, and community resources, education levels of various stakeholders, and general perceptions of concussion and athletic trainers. It is important to identify challenges athletic trainers may face in order to develop strategies to align current concussion management procedures with current best practices.

Cailee E. Welch Bacon and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod are with the School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, A.T. Still University, Mesa, AZ. Cailee E. Welch Bacon, Gary W. Cohen, Dayna K. Tierney, and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod are with Athletic Training Programs, A.T. Still University, Mesa, AZ. Melissa C. Kay is with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC. Stephanie Mazerolle, PhD, ATC, University of Connecticut, is the report editor for this article.

Address author correspondence to Cailee E. Welch Bacon at cwelch@atsu.edu.
International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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