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Purpose:

To compare anabolic signaling responses to differing sequences of concurrent strength and endurance training in a fed state.

Methods:

Eighteen resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to the following experimental conditions: strength training (ST), strength followed by endurance training (ST-END), or endurance followed by strength training (END-ST). Muscle tissue samples were taken from the vastus lateralis before each exercise protocol, on cessation of exercise, and 1 h after cessation of strength training. Tissue was analyzed for total and phosphorylated (p-) signaling proteins linked to the mTOR and AMPK networks.

Results:

Strength-training performance was similar between ST, ST-END, and END-ST. p-S6k1 was elevated from baseline 1 h posttraining in ST and ST-END (both P < .05). p-4E-BP1 was significantly lower than baseline post-ST (P = .01), whereas at 1 h postexercise in the ST-END condition p-4E-BP1 was significantly greater than postexercise (P = .04). p-ACC was elevated from baseline both postexercise and 1 h postexercise (both P < .05) in the END-ST condition. AMPK, mTOR, p38, PKB, and eEF2 responded similarly to ST, ST-END, and END-ST. Signaling responses to ST, ST-END, and END were largely similar. As such it cannot be ascertained which sequence of concurrent strength and endurance training is most favorable in promoting anabolic signaling.

Conclusions:

In the case of the current study an acute bout of concurrent training of differing sequences elicited similar responses of the AMPK and mTOR networks.

Jones is with ASPIRE, Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar. Walshe and Hamilton are with the School of Sport, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK. Howatson, Russell, and Price are with the Dept of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. St Clair Gibson is with the School of Medicine, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa. French is with Notre Dame Athletics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN.

Address author correspondence to Duncan French at dfrench2@nd.edu.