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The relationship between recovery and fatigue and its impact on performance has attracted the interest of sport science for many years. An adequate balance between stress (training and competition load, other life demands) and recovery is essential for athletes to achieve continuous high-level performance. Research has focused on the examination of physiological and psychological recovery strategies to compensate external and internal training and competition loads. A systematic monitoring of recovery and the subsequent implementation of recovery routines aims at maximizing performance and preventing negative developments such as underrecovery, nonfunctional overreaching, the overtraining syndrome, injuries, or illnesses. Due to the inter- and intraindividual variability of responses to training, competition, and recovery strategies, a diverse set of expertise is required to address the multifaceted phenomena of recovery, performance, and their interactions to transfer knowledge from sport science to sport practice. For this purpose, a symposium on Recovery and Performance was organized at the Technical University Munich Science and Study Center Raitenhaslach (Germany) in September 2016. Various international experts from many disciplines and research areas gathered to discuss and share their knowledge of recovery for performance enhancement in a variety of settings. The results of this meeting are outlined in this consensus statement that provides central definitions, theoretical frameworks, and practical implications as a synopsis of the current knowledge of recovery and performance. While our understanding of the complex relationship between recovery and performance has significantly increased through research, some important issues for future investigations are also elaborated.

Kellmann and Heidari are with the Faculty of Sport Science, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany. Kellmann is also with the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia. Bertollo and Robazza are with the Dept of Medicine and Aging Sciences, University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. Bertollo is also with the Faculty of Health and Science, University of Suffolk, Ipswich, United Kingdom. Bosquet is with the Faculty of Sport Science, Poitiers University, Poitiers, France, and the Dept of Kinesiology, University of Montreal, Montréal, QC, Canada. Brink is with the Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. Coutts and Duffield are with Sport and Exercise Discipline Group, University of Technology Sydney, Moore Park, Australia. Erlacher is with the Inst of Sport Science, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. Halson is with the Div of Physiology, Australian Inst of Sport, Canberra, Australia. Hecksteden and Skorski are with the Inst for Sports and Preventive Medicine, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany. Kallus is with the University of Graz, Graz, Austria. Meeusen is with the Faculty LK–Human Physiology Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium, and the School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia. Mujika is with the Dept of Physiology, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Basque Country, Spain, and the School of Kinesiology, Finis Terrae University, Santiago, Chile. Venter is with the Dept of Sport Science, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. Beckmann is with the Dept of Sport and Health Sciences, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

Kellmann (michael.kellmann@rub.de) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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