The Quantification of Within-Week Session Intensity, Duration, and Intensity Distribution Across a Season in Australian Football Using the Session Rating of Perceived Exertion Method

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Context: Team-sport training requires the daily manipulation of intensity, duration, and frequency, with preseason training focusing on meeting the demands of in-season competition and training on maintaining fitness. Purpose: To provide information about daily training in Australian football (AF), this study aimed to quantify session intensity, duration, and intensity distribution across different stages of an entire season. Methods: Intensity (session ratings of perceived exertion; CR-10 scale) and duration were collected from 45 professional male AF players for every training session and game. Each session’s rating of perceived exertion was categorized into a corresponding intensity zone, low (<4.0 arbitrary units), moderate (≥4.0 and <7.0), and high (≥7.0), to categorize session intensity. Linear mixed models were constructed to estimate session duration, intensity, and distribution between the 3 preseason and 4 in-season periods. Effects were assessed using linear mixed models and magnitude-based inferences. Results: The distribution of the mean session intensity across the season was 29% low intensity, 57% moderate intensity, and 14% high intensity. While 96% of games were high intensity, 44% and 49% of skills training sessions were low intensity and moderate intensity, respectively. Running had the highest proportion of high-intensity training sessions (27%). Preseason displayed higher training-session intensity (effect size [ES] = 0.29–0.91) and duration (ES = 0.33–1.44), while in-season game intensity (ES = 0.31–0.51) and duration (ES = 0.51–0.82) were higher. Conclusions: By using a cost-effective monitoring tool, this study provides information about the intensity, duration, and intensity distribution of all training types across different phases of a season, thus allowing a greater understanding of the training and competition demands of Australian footballers.

Juhari, Pitchford, and Bartlett are with the Inst for Health and Sport (IHES), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Bartlett is also with the College of Sport & Exercise Science at the university. Ritchie and O’Connor are with the Bond Inst of Health & Sport, Faculty of Health Sciences & Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. Weston is with the Dept of Psychology, Sport & Exercise, School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Law, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom. Thornton is with La Trobe Sport & Exercise Medicine Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Bartlett (Jon.Bartlett@vu.edu.au) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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