Monitoring Training Load and Well-Being During the In-Season Phase in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Men’s Basketball

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To characterize the weekly training load (TL) and well-being of college basketball players during the in-season phase. Methods: Ten (6 guards and 4 forwards) male basketball players (age 20.9 [0.9] y, stature 195.0 [8.2] cm, and body mass 91.3 [11.3] kg) from the same Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association team were recruited to participate in this study. Individualized training and game loads were assessed using the session rating of perceived exertion at the end of each training and game session, and well-being status was collected before each session. Weekly changes (%) in TL, acute-to-chronic workload ratio, and well-being were determined. Differences in TL and well-being between starting and bench players and between 1-game and 2-game weeks were calculated using magnitude-based statistics. Results: Total weekly TL and acute-to-chronic workload ratio demonstrated high week-to-week variation, with spikes up to 226% and 220%, respectively. Starting players experienced a higher (most likely negative) total weekly TL and similar (unclear) well-being status compared with bench players. Game scheduling influenced TL, with 1-game weeks demonstrating a higher (likely negative) total weekly TL and similar (most likely trivial) well-being status compared with 2-game weeks. Conclusions: These findings provide college basketball coaches information to optimize training strategies during the in-season phase. Basketball coaches should concurrently consider the number of weekly games and player status (starting vs bench player) when creating individualized periodization plans, with increases in TL potentially needed in bench players, especially in 2-game weeks.

Conte is with the Inst of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania. Kolb and Santolamazza are with the Sports Performance Dept, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT. Scanlan is with the Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia.

Conte (daniele.conte@lsu.lt) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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