Gait Speed, Quality of Life, and Sedentary Time are Associated with Steps per Day in Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Osteoporosis

in Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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Aim:

To describe objectively-measured physical activity levels and patterns among community-dwelling older adults with osteoporosis, impaired balance, and fear of falling, and to explore the associations with gait, balance performance, falls self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

Methods:

Ninety-four individuals (75.6 ± 5.4 years) were included. Physical activity was assessed with pedometers and accelerometers. Mean steps/day, dichotomized into < 5,000 or = 5,000 steps/day, and time spent in different physical activity intensities were analyzed. Gait was assessed with a GAITRite walkway, balance performance was assessed with the modified figure-eight test and oneleg stance, falls self-efficacy was assessed with the Falls Efficacy Scale International, and HRQoL was assessed with Short Form-36.

Results:

Mean steps/day were 6,201 (991–17,156) and 40% reported < 5,000 steps/day. Participants with < 5,000 steps/day spent more time sedentary, had slower gait speed, poorer balance performance, and lower HRQoL than participants with ≥ 5,000 steps/day. No participants with < 5,000 met the recommended level of physical activity.

Dohrn, Hagströmer, and Ståhle are with the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. Hagströmer and Ståhle are also with the Physiotherapy Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden. Hellénius is with the Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.

Address author correspondence to Ing-Mari Dohrn at ing-mari.dohrn@ki.se.
Journal of Aging and Physical Activity