The Relationship Between Jumping and Sprinting Performance in Collegiate Ultimate Athletes

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Kyle Davis Georgia Southern University

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Stephen Rossi Georgia Southern University

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Jody Langdon Georgia Southern University

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Jim McMillan Georgia Southern University

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The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the relationship between jumping and sprinting among members of a regionally competitive club-level ultimate team. Twenty-two subjects (mean ± SD; 21.1±2.26 year) volunteered to participate in two testing sessions the week before the team’s regional tournament. Testing sessions included body-composition measurement, a 40-yard sprint (with a 10-yard split time recorded), a standing long jump (LJ) and a vertical jump (VJ). Pearson product-moment correlations revealed a significant negative correlation between LJ and 40-yard sprint time. Significant positive relationships were observed between VJ height and 10-yard power, VJ power and 10-yard power, VJ power and relative 10-yard power, relative VJ power and relative 10-yard power, BJ distance and 10-yard power, VJ height and 40-yard power, VJ power and 40-yard power, and relative VJ power and relative 40-yard power. BJ distance related significantly to 40-yard velocity, 40-yard power and 40-yard relative power. There appears to be a relationship between jumping ability and sprinting in this population, but more studies with this population are needed to confirm these results.

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