The Preferred Coaching Styles of Generation Z Athletes: A Qualitative Study

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Krisha Parker Georgia Southern University, USA

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Daniel Czech Georgia Southern University, USA

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Trey Burdette Georgia Southern University, USA

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Jonathan Stewart Georgia Southern University, USA

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David Biber Georgia Southern University, USA

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Lauren Easton Georgia Southern University, USA

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Caitlyn Pecinovsky Georgia Southern University, USA

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Sarah Carson Georgia Southern University, USA

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Tyler McDaniel Georgia Southern University, USA

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With over 50 million youth athletes participating in some kind of sports in the United States alone, it is important to realize the impact and benefits of playing (Weinberg and Gould, 2011). Physically, sports can help youth improve strength, endurance, weight control, and bone structure (Seefeldt, Ewing & Walk, 1992). Sport participation also benefits youths socially (Seefeldt, Ewing & Walk, 1992) and academically (Fraser-Thomas, Côté & Deakin, 2005). Optimal coaching education and training is a necessity if young athletes are to learn and improve in these aforementioned areas. In order for youth to grow from their sport experience, they need guidance from coaches, parents, and other important figures. Recent research by Jones, Jo and Martin (2007) suggests that more recent generations require a new approach to learning. The purpose of the current study was to qualitatively examine the preferred coaching styles of youth soccer players from Generation Z. After interviewing 10 youth athletes (five male, five female), four main themes emerged for Generation Z’s view of a “great coach.” These themes reflected the desire for a coach that: 1) does not yell and remains calm, 2) is caring and encouraging, 3) has knowledge of the sport, and 4) involves the team in decision making. Future research could include implementing a mixed-methodological approach incorporating the Leadership Scale for Sport (Chelladurai, 1984). Another avenue worthy of investigation is the role that technology plays for Generation Z athletes.

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