Comparison of activPAL and Actiwatch for Estimations of Time in Bed in Free-Living Adults

in Journal for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour
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  • 1 Division of Hematology and Oncology and Cardiovascular Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA
  • | 2 KAL Research and Consulting, LLC, Denver, CO, USA
  • | 3 Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • | 4 Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
  • | 5 Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • | 6 Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • | 7 Anschutz Health & Wellness Center, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
  • | 8 Rocky Mountain Regional Veterans Administration, Aurora, CO, USA
  • | 9 Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
  • | 10 Department of Kinesiology, School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
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Introduction: Patterns of physical activity (PA) and time in bed (TIB) across the 24-hr cycle have important implications for many health outcomes; therefore, wearable accelerometers are often implemented in behavioral research to measure free-living PA and TIB. Two accelerometers, the activPAL and Actiwatch, are common accelerometers for measuring PA (activPAL) and TIB (Actiwatch), respectively. Both accelerometers have the capacity to measure TIB, but the degree to which these accelerometers agree is not clear. Therefore, this study compared estimates of TIB between activPAL and the Actiwatch accelerometers. Methods: Participants (mean ± SDage = 39.8 ± 7.6 years) with overweight or obesity (N = 83) wore an activPAL and Actiwatch continuously for 7 days, 24 hr per day. TIB was assessed using manufacturer-specific algorithms. Repeated-measures mixed-effect models and Bland–Altman plots were used to compare the activPAL and Actiwatch TIB estimates. Results: Statistical differences between TIB assessed by activPAL versus Actiwatch (p < .001) were observed. There was not a significant interaction between accelerometer and day of wear (p = .87). The difference in TIB between accelerometers ranged from −72.9 ± 15.7 min (Day 7) to −98.6 ± 14.5 min (Day 3), with the Actiwatch consistently estimating longer TIB compared with the activPAL. Conclusion: Data generated by the activPAL and Actiwatch accelerometers resulted in divergent estimates of TIB. Future studies should continue to explore the validity of activity monitoring accelerometers for estimating TIB.

Hidde (mchidde@mcw.edu) is corresponding author, https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2829-1551

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