Background:

The first Danish Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth describes Denmark’s efforts in promoting and facilitating PA and PA opportunities for children and youth.

Methods:

The report card relies primarily on a synthesis of the best available research and policy strategies identified by the Report Card Research Committee consisting of a wide presentation of researchers and experts within PA health behaviors and policy development. The work was coordinated by Research and Innovation Centre for Human Movement and Learning situated at the University of Southern Denmark and the University College Lillebaelt. Nine PA indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card development process.

Results:

Grades from A (highest) to F (lowest) varied in Denmark as follows: 1) Overall Physical Activity (D+), 2) Organized Sport Participation (A), 3) Active Play (INC; incomplete), 4) Active Transportation (B), 5) Sedentary Behaviors (INC), 6) Family and Peers (INC), 7) School (B), 8) Community and the Built Environment (B+), and 9) Government strategies and investments (A-).

Conclusions:

A large proportion of children in Denmark do not meet the recommendations for PA despite the favorable investments and intensions from the government to create good facilities and promote PA.

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Larsen is with the Center for Human Movement and Learning, Research and Development, University College Lillebaelt, Denmark. Troelsen is with the Research Unit for Active Living, Dept of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. Kirkegaard is with the Sports Confederation of Denmark. Riiskjær is with DGI, Denmark. Krølner is with the National Institute of Public Health, Denmark. Østergaard, Kristensen, and Møller are with the Research Unit for Exercise Epidemiology, Dept of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. Kristensen is also with the Region of Southern Denmark, Intersectoral Collaboration. Christensen is with the Danish School Sport. Jensen is with VIA University College, Faculty of Education and Social Studies, Denmark. Østergård is with the Dept of School and Learning, Metropolitan University College, Denmark. Skovgaard is with the Center for Human Movement and Learning, Dept of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark. Larsen (lrla@ucl.dk) is corresponding author.