Results From New Zealand’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health

Background:

In this article, we report the grades for the second New Zealand Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth, which represents a synthesis of available New Zealand evidence across 9 core indicators.

Methods:

An expert panel of physical activity (PA) researchers collated and reviewed available nationally representative survey data between March and May 2016. In the absence of new data, (2014–2016) regional level data were used to inform the direction of existing grades. Grades were assigned based on the percentage of children and youth meeting each indicator: A is 81% to 100%; B is 61% to 80%; C is 41% to 60%, D is 21% to 40%; F is 0% to 20%; INC is Incomplete data.

Results:

Overall PA, Active Play, and Government Initiatives were graded B-; Community Environments was graded B; Sport Participation and School Environment received a C+; Sedentary Behaviors and Family/Peer Support were graded C; and Active Travel was graded C-.

Conclusions:

Overall PA participation was satisfactory for young children but not for youth. The grade for PA decreased slightly from the 2014 report card; however, there was an improvement in grades for built and school environments, which may support regional and national-level initiatives for promoting PA.

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Maddison and Marsh are with the National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, New Zealand. Hinckson is with the Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. Duncan is with the School of Sport & Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. Mandic is with the School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Sciences, Otago University, New Zealand. Taylor is with the Dept of Human Nutrition, Otago University, New Zealand. Smith is with the School of Nursing, University of Auckland, New Zealand. Maddison (r.maddison@auckland.ac.nz) is corresponding author.