The Effect of Exercise Training on Total Daily Energy Expenditure and Body Composition in Weight-Stable Adults: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Background: The present study examined, among weight-stable overweight or obese adults, the effect of increasing doses of exercise energy expenditure (EEex) on changes in total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), total body energy stores, and body composition. Methods: Healthy, sedentary overweight/obese young adults were randomized to one of 3 groups for a period of 26 weeks: moderate-exercise (EEex goal of 17.5 kcal/kg/wk), high-exercise (EEex goal of 35 kcal/kg/wk), or observation group. Individuals maintained body weight within 3% of baseline. Pre/postphysical activity between-group measurements included body composition, calculated energy intake, TDEE, energy stores, and resting metabolic rate. Results: Sixty weight-stable individuals completed the protocols. Exercise groups increased EEex in a stepwise manner compared with the observation group (P < .001). There was no group effect on changes in TDEE, energy intake, fat-free mass, or resting metabolic rate. Fat mass and energy stores decreased among the females in the high-exercise group (P = .007). Conclusions: The increase in EEex did not result in an equivalent increase in TDEE. There was a sex difference in the relationship among energy balance components. These results suggest a weight-independent compensatory response to exercise training with potentially a sex-specific adjustment in body composition.

Hand is with the Department of Epidemiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shook is with the Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Mercy, Kansas City, MO, USA. O’Connor is with the Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA. Kindred is with the Department of Kinesiology, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA. Drenowatz is with the Division of Physical Education, University of Education Upper Austria, Linz, Austria. Paluch is with the Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA. Burgess is with the College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Blundell is with the Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom. Schumacher and Blair are with the Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. Blair is also with the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Hand (gahand@hsc.wvu.edu) is corresponding author.
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