Prevalence of Total and Domain-Specific Physical Activity and Associated Factors Among Nepalese Adults: A Quantile Regression Analysis

in Journal of Physical Activity and Health
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Aim: To analyze the data from the World Health Organization Nepal STEPS survey 2013 to determine the prevalence of total and domain-specific physical activity (PA) and associated factors among Nepalese adults. Methods: A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to proportionately select participants from the 3 ecological zones (Mountain, Hill, and Terai) in Nepal. The Global PA Questionnaire was used to assess PA. The data were analyzed using quantile and ordinary least square regression. Results: Only 4% of the adults did not meet the World Health Organization PA guidelines. Age had a negative monotonic association with total PA and occupational PA, with the highest difference at the upper tails of the PA distribution. Lower total PA and occupational PA were associated with secondary or higher education, being retired or in unpaid employment, living in Terai or urban areas, and nonsmoking. Age, higher education, unpaid employment, and Terai or urban residence were negatively associated, while being currently married was positively associated with transport-related PA. Conclusion: Increasing age, higher education, unpaid employment, unemployment or retirement, and urban residence were associated with lower PA, with the stronger association at the upper tails of the distribution. The correlates had dissimilar associations across the quantiles of PA distribution.

Paudel, Owen, Heritier, and Smith are with the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Smith is also with the Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Paudel (susan.paudelsubedi@monash.edu) is corresponding author.
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