Relationship between Competitive Trait Anxiety, State Anxiety, and Golf Performance: A Field Study

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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  • 1 North Texas State University
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The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the relationship between competitive trait anxiety (CTA), state anxiety, and golf performance in a field setting. Ten low, moderate, and high CTA collegiate golfers (N = 30) performed in a practice round on Day 1 and Day 2 of a competitive tournament. State anxiety results indicated a significant CTA main effect with low CTA subjects displaying lower state anxiety than moderate or high CTA subjects. The competition main effect was also significant, with post hoc tests indicating higher levels of state anxiety during Day 1 and Day 2 than during the practice round. Performance results produced a significant CTA main effect with low CTA subjects displaying higher levels of performance than moderate or high CTA subjects. Correlations between SCAT and state anxiety indicated that SCAT was a good predictor of precompetitive state anxiety. The direction of state anxiety and performance CTA main effects provide support for Oxendine's (1970) contentions that sports requiring fine muscle coordination and precision (e.g., golf) are performed best at low levels of anxiety. Future directions for research are offered.

This study was conducted by the second author in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the M.S. degree in Physical Education at North Texas State University. Reprint requests should be sent to Robert Weinberg, Physical Education Department - Box 13885, North Texas State University, Denton, TX 76203.

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