Is There Economic Discrimination on Sport Social Media? An Analysis of Major League Baseball

in Journal of Sport Management
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Prior studies have investigated consumer-based economic discrimination from a number of contexts in the sport industry. This study seeks to further such a line of inquiry by examining consumer interest in Major League Baseball players on the Twitter platform, especially considering the emergence of social media at the forefront of consumer behavior research. Specifically, the analysis uses six regression models that take into account an array of factors, including player characteristics, performance, market size, and so forth. Results reveal that when controlling for all other factors, Hispanic players receive significantly less consumer interest on social media than their counterparts, while Asian pitchers receive more. These findings yield critical insights into tendencies of sport consumer biases on digital platforms, assisting the development of an equal and efficient sport marketplace for stakeholders.

Watanabe and Yan are with the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Soebbing is with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Pegoraro is with the Faculty of Management, School of Sports Administration, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Nicholas M. Watanabe at nmwatana@olemiss.edu
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