Sexism in Professional Sports: How Women Managers Experience and Survive Sport Organizational Culture

in Journal of Sport Management
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Women remain the minority in sport organizations, particularly in leadership roles, and prior work has suggested that sexism may be to blame. This study examines women’s experiences of both overt and subtle sexism in the sport industry as well as the impact such experiences have on their careers. Based on interviews and journal entries from women managers working in a men’s professional sports league, the findings suggest that the culture of sport organizations perpetuates sexism, including the diminishment and objectification of women. Sexism occurs in women’s everyday interactions with their supervisors and coworkers, as well as others that they interact with as part of their jobs. Such experiences result in professional and emotional consequences, which women navigate by employing tactics that enable their survival in the sport industry.

The authors are with the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA.

Hindman (lhindman@umass.edu) is corresponding author.
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