Association of the Functional Movement Screen With Injuries in Division I Athletes

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context:

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition.

Objective:

To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry.

Design:

Prospective cohort.

Setting:

College athletic facilities.

Participants:

167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89).

Intervention:

The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination.

Main Outcome Measure:

Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season.

Results:

FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53–1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08–0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury.

Conclusion:

FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

Warren and Smith are with the Dept of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ. Chimera is with the Athletic Training Dept, Daemen College, Amherst, NY.

Address author correspondence to Meghan Warren at meghan.warren@nau.edu.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation