The Influence of Ambulatory Aid on Lower-Extremity Muscle Activation During Gait

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: Foot and ankle injuries are common and often require a nonweight-bearing period of immobilization for the involved leg. This nonweight-bearing period usually results in muscle atrophy for the involved leg. There is a dearth of objective data describing muscle activation for different ambulatory aids that are used during the aforementioned nonweight-bearing period. Objective: To compare activation amplitudes for 4 leg muscles during (1) able-bodied gait and (2) ambulation involving 3 different ambulatory aids that can be used during the acute phase of foot and ankle injury care. Design: Within-subject, repeated measures. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Sixteen able-bodied individuals (7 females and 9 males). Intervention: Each participant performed able-bodied gait and ambulation using 3 different ambulatory aids (traditional axillary crutches, knee scooter, and a novel lower-leg prosthesis). Main Outcome Measure: Muscle activation amplitude quantified via mean surface electromyography amplitude throughout the stance phase of ambulation. Results: Numerous statistical differences (P < .05) existed for muscle activation amplitude between the 4 observed muscles, 3 ambulatory aids, and able-bodied gait. For the involved leg, comparing the 3 ambulatory aids: (1) knee scooter ambulation resulted in the greatest vastus lateralis activation, (2) ambulation using the novel prosthesis and traditional crutches resulted in greater biceps femoris activation than knee scooter ambulation, and (3) ambulation using the novel prosthesis resulted in the greatest gastrocnemius activation (P < .05). Generally speaking, muscle activation amplitudes were most similar to able-bodied gait when subjects were ambulating using the knee scooter or novel prosthesis. Conclusions: Type of ambulatory aid influences muscle activation amplitude. Traditional axillary crutches appear to be less likely to mitigate muscle atrophy during the nonweighting, immobilization period that often follows foot or ankle injuries. Researchers and clinicians should consider these results when recommending ambulatory aids for foot or ankle injuries.

Sanders and Bowden are with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT. Baker is with the Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT. Jensen, Nichols, and Seeley are with the Department of Exercise Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.

Seeley (matthewkseeley@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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