Effect of Ibuprofen Use on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness of the El bow Flexors

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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This study evaluated the effectiveness of ibuprofen in treating delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the elbow flexors when taken prior to and following exercise. Twenty subjects received either 2,400 mg/day ibuprofen or a placebo four times per day. Subjects performed intense eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors to elicit DOMS. Concentric and eccentric peak torque production against an isokinetic resistance of 0.52 radls, range of motion at the elbow, and subjective soreness of the elbow flexors were measured. ANOVA indicated no significant group-by-time interaction for concentric peak torque, eccentric peak torque, or pain. A significant interaction was revealed for range of motion. There was a significant difference within each group's ROM but no interaction between groups. It was concluded that the use of 2,400 mg/day ibuprofen prior to and following intense eccentric exercise was no more effective than a placebo in treating DOMS of the elbow flexors.

Jayd M. Grossman was a student at the University of Virginia at the time of this study and is presently with the Department of Sports Medicine, University of Cincinnati. Brent L. Arnold and David H. Pemn are with the Athletic Training/Sports Medicine Laboratory, Curry School of Education, and David M. Kahler is with the Department of Orthopaedics, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903. Direct correspondence to David H. Penin, Memorial Gymnasium, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903.

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