The Association Between Perceived Athletic Competence and Physical Activity: Implications for Low-Income Schoolchildren

in Pediatric Exercise Science
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $68.00

1 year subscription

USD $90.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $129.00

2 year subscription

USD $168.00

Purpose: Socioeconomic status (SES) may impact children’s physical activity (PA) behaviors and confidence to participate in PA. We examined how SES modifies the relationship between children’s perceived athletic competence (PAC) and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA). Methods: Children (N = 1157; 45% male; grades 3–4) were recruited for the Fueling Learning through Exercise study. Free/reduced price lunch eligibility was used as an indicator of SES. Seven-day accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) was used to measure daily MVPA, out-of-school MVPA (O-MVPA), and school-time MVPA. PAC was assessed using the Harter’s Self-Perception Profile for Children (6 items, scored 1–4; median split: high and low PAC). Results: MVPA and PAC differed between low-SES [n = 556; 41.6 (17.1) min/d; high PAC = 45%] and middle-SES children [n = 412; 49.6 (22.7) min/d; high PAC = 62%]. There was an interaction between SES and PAC for MVPA (P < .001) and O-MVPA (P < .001), but not for school-time MVPA (P > .05). Middle-SES children with high PAC were more likely to engage in MVPA (β = 6.6 min/d; 95% confidence interval, 3.9 to 9.3; P < .001) and O-MVPA (β = 4.8 min/d; 95% confidence interval, 2.8 to 6.8; P < .001), associations that did not exist for low-SES children (P > .05). Conclusions: PAC was positively associated with daily MVPA and O-MVPA, but not among low-SES children. Research is needed to elucidate the factors that shape the relationship between PAC and MVPA.

Amin, Duquesnay, Wright, and Economos are with the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA. Chui is with the Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA. Sacheck is with the Dept. of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC.

Address author correspondence to Sarah A. Amin at s.amin@tufts.edu.
Pediatric Exercise Science

Article Sections

References

  • 1.

    Anderson-Butcher DRiley AAmorose AIachini AWade-Mdivanian R. Maximizing youth experiences in community sport settings: the design and impact of the LiFE Sports Camp. J Sport Manag. 2014;28(2):23649. doi:10.1123/jsm.2012-0237

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Asci FHKosar SNIsler AK. The relationship of self-concept and perceived athletic competence to physical activity level and gender among Turkish early adolescents. Adolescence. 2001;36(143):499. PubMed

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Babic MJMorgan PJPlotnikoff RCLonsdale CWhite RLLubans DR. Physical activity and physical self-concept in youth: systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Med. 2014;44(11):1589601. PubMed doi:10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Baker BLDavison KK. I know I can: a longitudinal examination of precursors and outcomes of perceived athletic competence among adolescent girls. J Phys Act Health. 2011;8(2):1929. doi:10.1123/jpah.8.2.192

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Cairney JKwan MYVelduizen SHay JBray SRFaught BE. Gender, perceived competence and the enjoyment of physical education in children: a longitudinal examination. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9(1):26. doi:10.1186/1479-5868-9-26

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Carlson JAMignano AMNorman GJet al. Socioeconomic disparities in elementary school practices and children’s physical activity during school. Am J Health Promot. 2014;28:4753. PubMed doi:10.4278/ajhp.130430-QUAN-206

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Cole DAMaxwell SEMartin JMet al. The development of multiple domains of child and adolescent self-concept: a cohort sequential longitudinal design. Child Dev. 2001;72(6):172346. PubMed doi:10.1111/1467-8624.00375

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Craven RGMarsh HW. The centrality of the self-concept construct for psychological wellbeing and unlocking human potential: implications for child and educational psychologists. Educ Child Psychol. 2008;25(2):10418.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Eime RMYoung JAHarvey JTCharity MJPayne WR. A systematic review of the psychological and social benefits of participation in sport for children and adolescents: informing development of a conceptual model of health through sport. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10(1):98. doi:10.1186/1479-5868-10-98

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Evenson KRCatellier DJGill KOndrak KSMcMurray RG. Calibration of two objective measures of physical activity for children. J Sports Sci. 2008;26(14):155765. PubMed doi:10.1080/02640410802334196

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Forneris TWhitley MABarker B. The reality of implementing community-based sport and physical activity programs to enhance the development of underserved youth: challenges and potential strategies. Quest. 2013;65(3):31331. doi:10.1080/00336297.2013.773527

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Franzini LElliott MNCuccaro Pet al. Influences of physical and social neighborhood environments on children’s physical activity and obesity. Am J Public Health. 2009;99(2):2718. PubMed doi:10.2105/AJPH.2007.128702

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Franzini LTaylor WElliott MNet al. Neighborhood characteristics favorable to outdoor physical activity: disparities by socioeconomic and racial/ethnic composition. Health Place. 2010;16(2):26774. doi:10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.10.009

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Fredricks JAEccles JS. Children’s competence and value beliefs from childhood through adolescence: growth trajectories in two male-sex-typed domains. Dev Psychol. 2002;38(4):51933. PubMed doi:10.1037/0012-1649.38.4.519

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Gould DFlett RLauer L. The relationship between psychosocial developmental and the sports climate experienced by underserved youth. Psychol Sport Exerc. 2012;13(1):807. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2011.07.005

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Harter S. The perceived competence scale for children. Child Dev. 1982;53:8797. doi:10.2307/1129640

  • 17.

    Hatfield DPLynskey VMEconomos CDNichols ERWhitman NBNelson ME. Crowdsourcing innovative physical activity programs: active schools acceleration project case study. Transl J Am Coll Sports Med. 2016;1(1):19. doi:10.1249/TJX.0000000000000724

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Holt NL. Positive Youth Development Through Sport. London, UK: Routledge; 2016.

  • 19.

    Hubbard KEconomos CDBakun Pet al. Disparities in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity among girls and overweight and obese schoolchildren during school- and out-of-school time. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016;13:39. PubMed doi:10.1186/s12966-016-0358-x

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Humbert MLChad KESpink KSet al. Factors that influence physical activity participation among high and low-SES youth. Qual Health Res. 2006;16(4):46783. doi:10.1177/1049732305286051

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Jacobs JELanza SOsgood DWEccles JSWigfield A. Changes in children’s self-competence and values: gender and domain differences across grades one through twelve. Child Dev. 2002;73(2):50927. doi:10.1111/1467-8624.00421

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Katzmarzyk PTMalina RM. Contribution of organized sports participation to estimated daily energy expenditure in youth. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 1998;10(4):37886. doi:10.1123/pes.10.4.378

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Kuczmarski RJOgden CLGrummer-Strawn LMet al. CDC growth charts: United States. Adv Data. 2000;314:127. PubMed

  • 24.

    NIH policy on reporting race and ethnicity data: subjects in clinical research [Internet]Bethesda, MD: NIH; 2001 [cited 2017 Jul 20]. Available from: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-01-053.html

    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Noordstar JJvan der Net JJak SHelders PJMJongmans MJ. Global self-esteem, perceived athletic competence, and physical activity in children: a longitudinal cohort study. Psychol Sport Exerc. 2016;22:8390. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2015.06.009

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Pate RRFreedson PSSallis JFTaylor WCSirard JTrost SGDowda M. Compliance with physical activity guidelines: prevalence in a population of children and youth. Ann Epidemiol. 2002;12(5):3038. PubMed doi:10.1016/S1047-2797(01)00263-0

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    Puyau MRAdolph ALVohra FAButte NF. Validation and calibration of physical activity monitors in children. Obes Res. 2002;10(3):1507. doi:10.1038/oby.2002.24

  • 28.

    Seabra AMendonça DMaia JWelk GBrustad RFonseca AMSeabra AF. Gender, weight status and socioeconomic differences in psychosocial correlates of physical activity in schoolchildren. J Sci Med Sport. 2013;16(4):3206. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2012.07.008

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    Singh GKKogan MDSiahpush Mvan Dyck PC. Independent and joint effects of socioeconomic, behavioral, and neighborhood characteristics on physical inactivity and activity levels among US children and adolescents. J Community Health. 2008;33(4):20616. PubMed doi:10.1007/s10900-008-9094-8

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 30.

    Sonstroem RJMorgan WP. Exercise and self-esteem: rationale and model. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1989;21(3):32937. PubMed doi:10.1249/00005768-198906000-00018

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    Southall JEOkely ADSteele JR. Actual and perceived physical competence in overweight and nonoverweight children. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2004;16(1):1524. doi:10.1123/pes.16.1.15

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Stein CFisher LBerkey CColditz G. Adolescent physical activity and perceived competence: does change in activity level impact self-perception? J Adolesc Health. 2007;40(5):462.e18. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.11.147

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    Strong WBMalina RMBlimkie CJRet al. Evidence based physical activity for school-age youth. J Pediatr. 2005;146:7327. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.01.055

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    Telama RYang XHirvensalo MRaitakari O. Participation in organized youth sport as a predictor of adult physical activity: a 21-year longitudinal study. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2006;18(1):7688. doi:10.1123/pes.18.1.76

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 35.

    Tergerson JLKing KA. Do perceived cues, benefits, and barriers to physical activity differ between male and female adolescents? J Sch Health. 2002;72(9):37480. PubMed doi:10.1111/j.1746-1561.2002.tb03562.x

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36.

    The Aspen Institute. State of Play 2016: Trends and Developments. Washington, DC: The Aspen Institute; 2016.

  • 37.

    Troiano RPBerrigan DDodd KWMasse LCTilert TMcDowell M. Physical activity in the United States measured by accelerometer. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008;40(1):1818. doi:10.1249/mss.0b013e31815a51b3

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38.

    Vandorpe BVandendriessche JVaeyens Ret al. Relationship between sports participation and the level of motor coordination in childhood: a longitudinal approach. J Sci Med Sport. 2012;15(3):2205. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2011.09.006

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39.

    Vedul-Kjelsås VSigmundsson HStensdotter AKHaga M. The relationship between motor competence, physical fitness and self-perception in children. Child Care Health Dev. 2012;38(3):394402. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2214.2011.01275.x

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40.

    Whitt-Glover MCTaylor WCFloyd MFYore MMYancey AKMatthews CE. Disparities in physical activity and sedentary behaviors among US children and adolescents: prevalence, correlates, and intervention implications. J Public Health Policy. 2009;30(1):S30934. doi:10.1057/jphp.2008.46

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41.

    Wigfield AEccles JSYoon KSHarold RDFreedman-Doan CBlumenfeld PC. Change in children’s competence beliefs and subjective task values across the elementary school years: a 3-year study. J Educ Psychol. 1997;89(3):45169. doi:10.1037/0022-0663.89.3.451

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 42.

    Wijtzes AIJansen WBouthoorn SHPot NHofman AJaddoe VWRaat H. Social inequalities in young children’s sports participation and outdoor play. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11(1):155. doi:10.1186/s12966-014-0155-3

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43.

    Wright CMDuquesnay PJAnzman-Frasca Set al. Study protocol: the Fueling Learning through Exercise (FLEX) study—a randomized controlled trial of the impact of school-based physical activity programs on children’s physical activity, cognitive function, and academic achievement. BMC Public Health. 2016;16(1):1078. PubMed doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3719-0

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 44.

    Ziviani JMacdonald DWard HJenkins DRodger S. Physical activity of young children: a two-year follow-up. Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2008;28(1):2539. PubMed doi:10.1300/J006v28n01_03

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Article Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 26 26 18
Full Text Views 0 0 0
PDF Downloads 0 0 0

Altmetric Badge

PubMed

Google Scholar