Relationship of Intensity and Direction of Competitive Anxiety with Coping Strategies

in The Sport Psychologist
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The purpose of the present study was to examine how coping strategies in sport relate to differences in levels of anxiety intensity and to the interpretation of these levels as being facilitative or debilitative to performance. British university athletes were asked to recall a recent stressful situation in their sport, the coping strategies they used, and the intensity and direction of their anxiety symptoms. Results showed that perceptions of facilitative cognitive anxiety were related to the use of problem-focused coping. High levels of cognitive anxiety intensity were related to emotion-focused coping and avoidance coping. With regard to somatic anxiety, there was a significant interaction between the intensity and direction dimensions in that similar high levels of anxiety intensity were related to different coping strategies, depending on whether somatic anxiety was perceived to be facilitative or debilitative. From a practical point of view, the results show that athletes with positive perceptions of their anxiety level are able to use effective coping strategies. Lastly, suggestions are offered for further exploration of the nature of the interrelationship between coping strategies and anxiety.

Nikos Ntoumanis is with the School of Leisure and Sport, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, LS6 3QS, UK; Stuart J.H. Biddle <S.J.H.Biddle@lboro.ac.uk> is with the Department of Physical Education, Sports Science, and Recreation Management at Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK.

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