Gender and School-Level Differences in Students’ Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity Levels When Taught Basketball Through the Tactical Games Model

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Stephen Harvey West Virginia University

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Megan L. Smith West Virginia University

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Yang Song West Virginia University

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David Robertson West Virginia University

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Renee Brown West Virginia University

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Lindsey R. Smith University of Bedfordshire

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The Tactical Games Model (TGM) prefaces the cognitive components of physical education (PE), which has implications for physical activity (PA) accumulation. PA recommendations suggest students reach 50% moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). However, this criterion does not indicate the contribution from vigorous physical activity (VPA). Consequently, this study investigated: a) the effects of TGM delivery on MVPA/VPA and, b) gender/school level differences. Participants were 78 seventh and 96 fourth/fifth grade coeducational PE students from two different schools. Two teachers taught 24 (middle) and 30 (elementary) level one TGM basketball lessons. Students wore Actigraph GT3× triaxial accelerometers. Data were analyzed using four one-way ANOVAs. Middle school boys had significantly higher MVPA/VPA (34.04/22.37%) than girls (25.14/15.47%). Elementary school boys had significantly higher MVPA/VPA (29.73/18.33%) than girls (23.03/14.33%). While TGM lessons provide a context where students can accumulate VPA consistent with national PA recommendations, teachers need to modify lesson activities to enable equitable PA participation.

Harvey, Song, Robertson, and Brown are with the Department of Coaching and Teaching Studies, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. Smith is with the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Smith is with Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Bedfordshire, Bedford, UK.

Address author correspondence to Stephen Harvey at stephen.harvey@mail.wvu.edu.
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